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Spider Photos - Argiope Mangal

Disclaimer: Replies that I publish are done so with no guarantee of authenticity or validity. Please DO NOT rely on identifications from any other than an official source like a Museum or entomologist. Furthermore, where a spider is described as  "not dangerous" does not mean that it doesn't bite or cause a reaction. Any spider can bite and some people react differently to others, so it's best to treat all spiders with caution. That doesn't mean of course, going around killing them!!! Leave them alone and they will leave you alone - we are NOT spider prey and they don't jump in out mouths while we are asleep or attack unprovoked! Most countries only have one or two spiders that are considered really dangerous to humans, there are thousands of spiders that aren't!!
Here's some photos of Argiopes,  mainly from the United States.  In Australia, we call our variety St. Andrew's Cross (Agiope Mangal) but in the United States they are more commonly called a Black and Yellow Argiope.  (Argiope aurantia).  Please choose a section.
Unidentified Spiders 2017 Unidentified Spiders 2016 Unidentified Spiders 2015
Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black & Brown House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Dew Drop Spiders Fishing Spiders
Funnel Web (Aus) Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers
Ghost Spider Giant House Spider Golden Orb Weavers
Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders Hacklemesh Weavers
Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders Jewelled Spiders
Jumping Spiders Lace Web  Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Red & Black Spiders Redback Spiders
Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders
Segestria Florentina Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders
Spider Tats Spitting Spiders Steatoda
Tailless Whip Scorpions Tarantulas Tengellid Spiders
Titiotus (Recluse look alike) Trapdoor Spiders Tree Trunk Spider
Two Spined Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders Wandering Spiders
White Tailed Spider Widow Spiders Wolf Spiders
Woodlouse Hunters

Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders

Zoropsis spinimana
Zygiella x-notata    
St Andrews Cross Black & Yellow Argiopes Banded Argiopes
Argiope Lobata Gea Hepatgon Silver Argiopes
Argiope Appensa Argiope Bruennichi Argiope Sector
Other Argiopes    


Here's the Australian St Andrew's Cross spider - St Andrews Cross Spider: Argiope mangal
These spiders get their name for the way their hold their eight legs in pairs to form an X shape. The X is called the St. Andrew's cross because it is believed that the saint was martyred on a cross of this shape rather than the conventional + shape. Besides their standard orb-web, Argiope spiders build additional white opaque zig zag lines on their webs, called stabilimentum. Sometimes the zig-zag lines match their leg positions, which lead some people to suggest that this helps give the appearance of longer legs. Some spiders build a single vertical line, yet others a patch of zig zags in the centre of the web. No matter the design, the spider sits right smack in the middle.

The bite of this spider is considered harmless or at most to cause a weak local reaction. Few bites have been recorded.


13 January, 2011:
Glenda, another one for your collection. Under the house now. Stefan

Click for a larger view

23 February, 2010:
Hiya, Can you tell me what this is???
I live in Mossman, FNQ, AU and this is in my yard..... Have lots of Golden Orbs, and other easily identifiable spiders all the time, but this is a newbie to me....Would appreciate your help.


9 April 2009:
Here's some photos sent in by my next door neighbour, Stefan. He has commented on the zigzag stabilimentum. This is normal for all argiopes but the St Andrews Cross one usually builds theirs in the cross shape which gives it its name. This one appears to have used the stabilimentum to wrap up its prey which you can see behind the spider.

Click for a larger view


28 May, 2008:
Hi Glen, Firstly, What a terrific site you have. I took this photo of a spider then googled images of spiders to see what type it was. It linked to your site. I have been reading so much quality information on spiders from your site. I absolutely love your site. Now onto the photo. This was taken in my backyard. What I found most unusual was the fact that this spider was on the tree. I live in Regentville, NSW, Australia Many thanks and keep up the great work. Regards, BJ

Click for a larger view

22 May, 2008:
This St Andrew's Cross is jut a baby. As Winter is nearly here it's unusual for it to still be around. It has found a nice spot on my orchids. Photos G. Crew

Click for a larger view

8 January, 2006:
This St Andrew's Cross is about 7cm in length and is quite large. Photos G. Crew