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Spider Photos - Huntsman - 2012-17

Many people are confused by  5 similar looking spiders - the harmless Huntsman, Wolf Spider,  Southern House Spider (Kukulcania), Fishing Spider and  the notorious Brown Recluse.  Occasionally, the Huntsman Spider, Heteropoda venatoria (Linnaeus), is misidentified as a Brown Recluse. However, the colour pattern on the carapace of this species is reversed, with a light median mark on a dark background, and adults of this spider are much larger than a brown recluse. Huntsman spiders are large, long-legged spiders, measuring up to 15 cm across the legs. They are mostly grey to brown, sometimes with banded legs. Many huntsman spiders, especially Delena (the flattest), and including Isopeda, Isopedella and Holconia, have rather flattened bodies adapted for living in narrow spaces under loose bark or rock crevices. This is aided by their legs which, instead of bending vertically in relation to the body, have the joints twisted so that they spread out forwards and laterally in crab-like fashion ("giant crab spiders"). Both Brown (Heteropoda) and Badge (Neosparassus) Huntsman spiders have less flattened bodies. Huntsman spiders, like all spiders, moult in order to grow and often their old skin may be mistaken for the original spider when seen suspended on bark or in the house. The lifespan of most Huntsman species is about two years or more. Predators of Huntsman Spiders include birds and geckoes, Spider Wasps, nematode worms and egg parasites (wasps and flies).  

Here's some photos sent in by viewers.  All photos are copyright to their owners and may not be reproduced without permission. Please choose a section.

Unidentified Spiders 2017 Unidentified Spiders 2016 Unidentified Spiders 2015
Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black & Brown House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Dew Drop Spiders Fishing Spiders
Funnel Web (Aus) Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers
Ghost Spider Giant House Spider Golden Orb Weavers
Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders Hacklemesh Weavers
Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders Jewelled Spiders
Jumping Spiders Lace Web  Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Neoscona Semarak
Nursery Web Spiders Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders
Pseudoscorpion Purseweb Spider Red & Black Spiders
Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders Running Crab Spiders
Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina Solfugids/Camel Spiders
Southern House Spiders Spider Tats Spitting Spiders
Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions Tarantulas
Tengellid Spiders Titiotus (Recluse look alike) Two Spined Spiders
Trapdoor Spiders Tree Trunk Spider Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders White Tailed Spider Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana

Zygiella x-notata


Huntsman spiders are not found in the United States any further north than Southern California. They can not survive but in the most tropical of situations which are hot all year round, or in desert scrubland like the Olios giganteus on my website. That is one thing to consider before labelling a spider from the states as a Huntsman. Most are imported, and fewer than 3 species are common enough to be called native to this country, besides some smaller Olios species, which are found in the southwest (not San Francisco, which is in Northern California). While you may in some rare instance find a huntsman up north, it'll die as soon as season changes occur. - Paul Day

2012 - 2017 2011 2010 2008 - 2009
2007 - 2008  2005 - 2006 2001 - 2004 Banded Huntsman
Rain Spider  Badge Huntsman Green Huntsman  

24 October, 2016:  
I may have identified the spider by Googling ''green spider''. Could it be a Micrommata Virescens ( or closely related) ?


23 March, 2016:  
Hello Glen, Have found this little one (less than 4cm diameter) in my shirt :-) Live on a small island, north of Mozambique. Shared it on a forum of southern african spiders and came back as Huntsman Olio. This is for the picture bank as you mention that the green are not so common. Cheers lucie

Click photos for a larger view


10 December, 2015:  
Hi. Can you possibly tell me what spider this is pls? Regards Cindy


Reply: This is one of the huntsman species. Don't often see the green ones though!! - glen

29 April, 2015:  
Not sure if I am sending this to the right e-mail address, found two on your site! I would be most grateful if you could ID this little fella that I found in my garden in Crete, Greece. With thanks. Carol


Reply: This is a  green huntsman spider (Micrommata virescens) is a spider with a palearctic distribution, of the huntsman spider (Sparassidae) family. M. virescens is a species occurring naturally in Northern and Central Europe, including Denmark. It does not build a web, and hunts insects in green vegetation, where it is well camouflaged. - glen

8 June, 2014:  
Hi I live in spain near Cadiz I found this in the wood store on the door, I think spiders (most) are very interesting but I have not seen a spider like this before, if you can ID it I would appreciate the info. Thanks Craig

Another Reply from Laura: Possibly a giant crab spider (Sparassidae)? I don't know where the photo was taken but found one similar called Olios Milleti Pocock from India. 

Reply: I have never seen a spider like this one before!!- glen

11 March, 2012:
an you tall me Wat spider this is plz

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