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Spider Photos - 2003

Here are some photos sent in by viewers in 2003. Please select a section below.
Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    

UNIDENTIFIED SPIDERS 2003

 29 December, 2003:
Hi,

Interesting site! The attached pic shows a spider I found on my garage wall, I can't figure out what it is. Can you help me? The body size is about 20mm.

Thanks,
George Brautigam,
Perth
WA

Reply: George thought maybe a Sac spider?

..
14 December, 2003:
Hello, my daughter and I are doing an online photo collection of animals, http://groups.msn.com/LindasWildlife/shoebox.msnw and we are having some trouble with some of our spider identifications. They just look so similar! Could you help us out with some of these?

..
Reply: This is some sort of garden orb weaver.
14 December, 2003:

Here's another - this species seems to appear ONLY in the fall for some  reason. I've never seen them in the spring/summer, but as soon as the  temp. starts to drop here in southern Ontario, these spiders show up with its web around windows and doorways.
- Marc (St. Catharines, On)
..
Reply: This is a wolf spider.
24 November, 2003:
Hi,
I came across this spider here in Tucson Arizona, which is in the USA. I know you are in Australia and that is a far cry from Arizona USA but we were hoping you could help. We cannot really find where this spider is living besides in my garage somewhere. We were hoping you could help identify this critter.
Thanks
Brent McCoy
Tucson Arizona
..
24 November, 2003:
Hi ...
Spiders and scorpions are common in this part of Oaxaca, Mexico, including black widows. This fall, after the rainy season, this type of spider popped up everywhere, often in sunny places, as opposed to the dark nooks favored by the black widows. It's about 1.5-2 inches in length. Any ideas on what it is, and how nasty it might be, are appreciated.
Cheers,
Tim
Tim Porter
www.timporter.com
..

Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph, possibly a trapdoor spider.
21 November, 2003:
Hello!
I live In Galssel Park in Los Angeles. This fellow came up to me while i was having coffee in my garden. Surely scared the.... Could you help me ID it? I'm attaching the picture i took of it.
Thanks
Miq

 

..
Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph, possibly a trapdoor spider.
19 November, 2003:
I found a rather nasty looking spider in my garage and was wondering if you knew what kind it was. It looks like some sort of purse spider or a trap door spider. Why was it in my garage then?

Click for a nice close-up.

..
16 November, 2003:
Ontario dock spiders.

In case you wanted some hi-resolution shots of them.... (they grow VERY large up at our cottage near Parry Sound)
- Marc (St. Catharines, On)

..
2 December, 2003:
Reply: This spider looks to me like a wandering-spider (Phoneutria nigriventer) - maybe the most venomous species on earth. Perhaps even more venomous than your australian Atrax atrax... but it's only MAYBE a Phoneutria nigriventer. If yes, then Jean was really lucky. This species is really agressive. Felix Hug
Click the 4th picture for a closeup of the eyes. Glad this poor fellow was dead before the pins went in!!
13 November, 2003:
Hi .....
I greatly enjoyed your spider's website and the enormous deal of information it contains.....I've been studying spiders for about 15 years now and somebody from a fruit store in my region brought me this huge specimen! It measures 5 inches across (leg to leg) and it was found alive in a banana crate from Columbia, it died couples of days after! here are some pictures of it! thanks in advance......any info on this specimen would be appreciated!
Jean

..
10 November, 2003:
I spent a few hours on your website attempting to identify this spider I found in September of 2001. It was at least 1 1/2" body size. With leg span about 5". I found it in the woods in Maryland. It is complexing to me because it is large enough to be a fishing spider (compare with tree leaves it is on) but yet is on a web that it is using to capture prey. Sorta resembles a nursery web spider also. It was very "velvety brown". Lots of short dense hair all over. Any ideas?
xtremlysassi@aol.com
..
Reply: This is probably a venusta orchard  spider.
9 November, 2003:
My email address is dennismenace38@earthlink.net I am trying to find out what kind of spider this is, I found it in Inverness this morning attach to my shrubs. Please email me back when you get a chance Thanks

..
Reply: This is a female grass spider/nursery web weaver spider.

6 November, 2003:
Hi, We have been inundated with the spider in the attached photos. We run across at least 2-5 every day, for the past year. I travel to Nevada, Arizona, Utah, etc. at least once a year, and think that I may have picked up some eggs while out there.
I live in New Jersey. The spiders are usually found in the basement (finished), and on the first floor. They usually stay on the floor, and are not very active walkers. My daughter has had several unexplained bites (that appear when she wakes up), and Im concerned that the spiders have been protecting themselves. Can you help identify them?

..
5 November, 2003:
What Kind of Spider is this? This picture was taken in my great grandma's house in Barbados. The only possible match I found came from your site, the bodies are different.
~Alliea~

..

5 November, 2003:
Hi. I found this spider in my bathroom. I live in North Central, WV. I cant find a picture that looks like it anywhere and I would like to know what it is. Can you please let me know if you have any ideas?
Thanks,
Lindsay
Reply: This looks like a typical 'daddy long legs' spider to me. Harmless to humans.
From the website: http://spiders.ucr.edu/daddylonglegs.html

..

5 November, 2003:
Hi,
This we thought was a black widow due to the shape of the shiny blackbody until we got it in a glass and saw the underside was not the
expected red. Do you know what type it is?
It was crawling up the side of our house when it came to our attention and after we photographed it, we let it go deep in our woods. Thanks for your help!

..
12 November, 2003:
Hi, I sent you the pics for the spider labeled Nov. 4th. I have managed to ID the spider as Hogna carolensis, or the Giant Carolina wolf spider. I am also including 2 new pictures of her that you may want to switch with the blurry ones I sent before.
Thanks,
Drew Z.
seaducer9@comcast.net

4 November, 2003:
Hi, great site.
Found a spider last week here in New Jersey, USA. I have never seen any spider like this one here, and as it is starting to get cold I decided to keep it, I think it hitch hiked a ride on a produce truck or something. I am including shots of the back, a little fuzzy, the abdomen, fangs, bottom, and a feeding pic. The spider is eating a cricket that is about 1 1/2 centimeters long. With the leg span included, the spider is about 6-8 cm long ( est since she won't stay still for a reference.) Anyway, if you can ID it, I need some info on how big it gets, how long it lives, or maybe a link to a good natural history source?
Thank you,
Drew Z.
seaducer9@comcast.net

..
1 November, 2003:
Hi-
You website is great. I took this picture in the
Philippines on So. Leyte. I would see these all the time, and they were quick to throw their legs back and show their fangs. What kind is it? They were black and yellow and
would have 3-4 foot webs between banana trees. This one was still alive, my missionary companion (a native filipino) wasn't at all afraid of it, and he kind of mad it 'tired'
before he handed it to me by the one leg.
Kyle
Layton, Ut

2 December, 2003:
Reply:This spider looks look some sort of Nephila species.
Felix Hug

..
30  October, 2003:
I'm attaching a picture of a spider I encountered on 10/30/03 in a hollowed out tree in Southern Lower Michigan. In the picture, it is upside down. The legs look quite substantial with alternate colour banding on them.
Can you identify it?
Thanks,
Rick Gloger
..
30  October, 2003:
Here is a picture of the spider that I want identified and any information you might find. It measures 1 3/4 inches long by 1 1/2
inches wide. It has made a web that covers the entire top half of one of our windows that is on a shady side of the house (shaded by a pine and maple tree). The legs are
black and white stripes with the part of the legs that are close to the body being a bright reddish/orange. The body is a yellowish/white with a intricate black pattern.
Please call me or email any information or questions.
Thanks,
Cathy Kerby
Chesapeake, VA 23322

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply: This is a Marbled Orb Weaver

..
25 October, 2003:
Hey my names Gina & I found this spider outside in my yard hangin on a powerline type thing... I was just curious, are the poisonous or anything? There were two of them sharing a web. Please email me back and let me know what ya think I attached that photo so you would know what it looks like. Thanx for your time!
Gina



Reply: This is a spiny orb weaver.
(asteracantha cancriformis)

..
24 October, 2003:
Hey,
I have just not to long ago found a spider. I was kinda freaked out by this thing. I took some pics of it as I have no Idea what it is. Was wondering if you could give me some insight on this. It was found in Northern Texas.
-Ryan

..

24 October, 2003:
i found at least one of this each month inside my house and i am in worry about the venom. i have 3 little daugthers. do you think this spider is dangerous? the spiders are about one and a half inch or two inch in diameter.
thank you in advance.
17 September, 2004:
Reply: I may be wrong, but these look extremely close to the brown recluses I have running all over my place. I cannot tell if it is or not without a clear shot of the back, but better safe than sorry, right!??
john

..
8 October, 2003:
Hi, nice website. I think the unidentified blue tarantula sent in by Mike may possibly be a Burmese Blue, which I think is Haplopus lividus but the last I heard there was some dipute over the taxonomy of this species. It seems to come from the right part of the world but I found the specimen I kept to be cursorial rather than nesting in tree holes, but who knows? It`s colour could also be a photographic abberation but I`ve sent a pic along of a blue, use it if you like but you may need to make it smaller.

BTW, I`m the owner of the Smallestroom site you mention on the Black Widow page. ( I`ve sacked my typist friend for the spelling mistake, LOL) Would you mind if I put a link to your site on there?

All the best,
Alan
..
3 October, 2003:
Dear Glen
Here is the second spider. It was very abundant in the forest of Long Island, 50km off the NE coast of Papua New Guinea.
Best wishes
Mike

2 December, 2003:
Reply: The photo taken in New Guinea from 3rd October is a Nephila species, maybe Nephila maculata (golden orb-weaver).
Felix Hug

 

Hi Glen
Here is the first one. It was taken in Sarawak, East Malaysia (Borneo) in the Kelabit Highlands between Bario and Batu Lawi. The spider was pretty big (about 20cm) across from toe to toe, very hairy and living in a tree hole at 2m height.

I'll send the other in a few minutes.
Cheers
Mike

..
Reply: This looks like a brown widow - be careful.

29 September, 2003:
Found a spider that just tried to walk in my front door. I live in West Valley City, Utah, USA. The size isn't apparent from the photo, but I'd say its leg span front to back was about one and a half inches (4-5cm). I have a 13 month old son so I worry about him coming into contact with larger spiders out of curiosity. It doesn't match any of the really poisonous ones that I am aware of in our area, but better safe than sorry. Can you tell me what this is?

Thanks
David Wilbur

..
29 September, 2003:
Hi, I was wondering if you could help me identify this spider i found in my yard. I tried to identify it with no luck. I live in North East Pennsylvania. Thank you. I love your website.

Danielle

..
Reply: This is a wolf spider.

26 September, 2003:
We have caught a spider in our home that looks a lot like a wolf spider but it is gray and the marking do not coincide with what the wolf spider has on its back. Can you please tell me what it is if it is identifiable. It was caught in Park City Utah. We also have many more around the area but none of this size. He is 3 inches long with a black bottom just like a wolf spider. But the top does not match.
Thank you for any help,
Frank Mysliwiec
frank@grampysworkshop.com

..
Reply: This one is a garden orb weaver.
23 September, 2003:

Hello,
I live in Northern California: Oakland. Close to the redwoods. I was gardening one morning and discovered that a large spider had built a large web over my vegetable garden. She is about 1" long. I haven't seen a spider like this around and wanted to make sure she wasn't poisonous. I have been hearing about a brown spider that is
poisonous in Oakland.  Please look at the photos I have attached. I got some pretty good shots. One is of
her tummy and one is of her back. Is She Poisonous? Let me know if you need any more information and if you are able to identify her.Very curious about her identity.
Thanks,
minettm@sbcglobal.net

..
Reply: 9 November, 2003:
Glen,
I had a spider similar to the one Susaanne Steadman from Ontario describes in the "Unidentified Spiders 2003" (below).  I cut the picture and included the link to the site that describes the spider.  Appearsto be benign if this is actually what she saw.
Regards,
Mike Kay Meyer
http://spiders.entomology.wisc.edu/Dysderidae/Dysdera/crocata.html
22 September, 2003:
Hi there, my name is Sue.
I've been looking all through the internet and have had no luck finding the name of a spider I found in my basement. I've from Southern Ontario, in Canada. The spider I was about an inch in size, red legs, white round body with a smaller round black head. I've attached a picture of what it looked like, but I didn't have a camera at the time. It's really bugging me and I'd like to know if you can help.
Thank you,
Sincerely,
Susanne Steadman
..
22 September, 2003:
Hello. I've already asked about this little spider I found in my backyard in Houston, TX. You responded with some info. about it. I just wanted to send you a photo in case you could use it on your site.
(We have found an orange one, a yellow one, and a white one so far. Isn't it cool?) They make very strong webs in high places. What did you say it was called again? It is a relative of the Jeweled spider, right? Thanks again for your help.

Melissa Powers
mm.powers@earthlink.net
Reply: This is a spiny orb weaver.
(asteracantha cancriformis)

..

21 September, 2003:
hi. i found this on my door, and based on the width of of that rectangle,  this spider should be between 4 and 5 inches long. i've tried a few sites,  and i haven't really found anything that looks really similar. is it  poisonous? should i worry? i just wanna know what it is. thanks!

Reply: Looks like a Huntsman from the shape and size. 

..
21 September, 2003:
Hello!
Awesome site! I live in Hollywood California and I caught a black widow and kept it in a jar for about a month. I fed her flies and other spiders whenever I caught them and she aggressively attacked and consumed her prey.  Yesterday, however, I place a fairly big spider I caught in the jar with the widow. The widow attacked many times over the course of an hour. The other spider would not die. It retreated every time the widow attacked even thought it was 3 times the size. I went upstairs for about 20 minutes, and when I returned, the widow was dead and inside the mouth of the other spider! I keep reading that the widow is the most poisonous in North America so I do not understand how this happened! I have attached a picture from your site what the spider looks like. Can a spider I found in my garage fight and win against a black widow?
Please advise!
Thanks,
Anthony
Reply: This is a garden orb weaver.

..
Reply: This is a garden orb weaver.
21font> September, 2003:
Hi,
I took these pictures of a spider that has recently made it's home under our deck. Oun next-door neighbour also have one of these guys under their deck. We're in Maryland (U.S.). It looks much like the spider sent in on 7 September, 2003 by Mitch and Jo Shaw but may not be a match. If anyone could assist with identification we would be grateful. Thanks.
Vicky Ames & Belynda Hicks
Gaithersburg, MD USA

..
19 September, 2003:
I found this spider on my mothers porch in central Indiana. I'm not sure what it is though. It is about the size of a quarter, but when it's moving it's more like the size of a half-dollar. Do you know what it is? ssupafly85@yahoo.com
Thank you,
Steve
Reply: This one looks like another garden orb weaver. They and the Argiopes are being seen a lot at this time of the year.
glen
..
19 September, 2003:
Dear Spider Expert,
This is a picture I took of a spider that lives among my tomato plants in the open sun in Central Ohio.  I have noticed my "pet" for several years, but there always only seems to be one of them inhabitating the tomatoes.  From looking through your website, I think it might be a Argiope aurantia.  I have always called it a garden spider.  If you could let me know, I would really appreciate it.  There has been more than one instance when I was picking tomatoes and got quite a scare because I got too close to the spider without seeing it.  Usually I look for it every year and wherever it happens to settle becomes its own, personal tomato plant.  I have always left it alone because I guess I figured anything that brightly colored is probably poisonous to some degree and I don't want to find out the hard way. If you could let me know what it is, I would really appreciate it.  Feel free to use this picture however you like. Thank you!
Amelia Walton
Reply: Yes this is Argiope aurantia

..
17 September, 2003:
Fantastic site!!! Can you identify this one I found in a rug on my porch in San Francisco today? Sorry- I only have a photo of it's underside.


Thanks Don Zirulnik

--

..
Reply: This is a huntsman of some sort.
17
September, 2003:
hi, i live here in the Philippines and i am a mountaineer, on one occasion we came across a spider just sitting there  on a fallen tree, i don't know the name so i'm sending you  an image of him, hoping you might identify him. Its body is  around 1 inch in diameter, its legs are around 3 inches long each.  hope you can help me.  thank you and more power.  Lemuel R. Galera
http://www.sps-spitech.com
l.galera@spitech.com

..
24 September, 2003:
Hi, Glen!
Got a roll of film developed with a new picture of that baby huntsman. Notice the eye reflection. If I understand what I've read on spiders recently, huntsmen and wolf spiders are the only ones with reflective
eyes.
Pat

17 September, 2003:
Glen,
As the search goes on for an adult, I found a baby last night. And where was it? In the baby's room, of course!<G> See attached photos. Still no clear photo of the back though.
Pat
 

..
16 September, 2003:
Hi Glen,

Here's another shot of the spider we found on our tent in Killbear Provincial Park in Central Ontario (original post was on Sept 9/03) -- this is a much clearer picture. Hopefully, someone will be able to tell us what kind of spider it is.

Thanks!
Michelle
..
Reply: Looks like a grass spider/funnel weaver.
16b> September, 2003:
Hi,
We were in Australia recently and I found this spider (alive) in the room where we keep our luggage. I killed it but wanted to figure out what it was in case it laid some eggs somewhere. I can't seem to identify it after looking at hundreds of pictures on your website and others. Your help would be greatly appreciated.
Many thanks,
Carrie
Philadelphia, PA

..

13 September, 2003: Love the website. Thought you would like to see some pictures. We live in East Tennessee and have recently been invaded by literally hundreds of these spiders. They are large at just over a 50 cent piece. I think that it is a type of Golden Orb Weaver. You will only see them at night and they build beautiful, large webs that are super strong (we have many strong thunderstorms this time of year and the webs usually survive.) Their diets seems to consist of flying insects, although we have noticed a couple types of moths that seem to see the webs and fly around them. Sorry about the flashback in the 2nd and 3rd pictures, but was using a digital camera. Thanks!

Nice pics thanks, click to see a larger view.

..
10 September, 2003:
Glen,
Pardon the interruption. I couldn't see a link to submit spider pics. I have quite a few of the spiders in the attached photo. I have always assumed they were a wolf spider of some type and therefore nothing to worry about. However, I have had numerous sightings in the house over the past few months and now we have a one-month-old son to worry about. Can someone ID this guy from the attached photos? He popped out of the coffee cupboard one morning recently.
Thanks,
Patrick Huber
Anaheim, CA
So. California
USA
15 September, 2003:
Reply:"
The spider in these pictures looks like a desert loxoceles. in the book i have the info on this spider says " The venom of this species is significantly less dangerous to people than that of most violin spiders. A faint indication of a dark, violin shaped mark is sometimes present on the abdomen, but never enough to warrant giving this species the common name "violin Spiders". "

..
10 September, 2003:
I found this spider in the mountains of North Carolina in a patch of wildflowers. I've been trying to identify it and the only similar spider I have come across is the spiny backed gasterocanthinae. The one in my picture only has two large spikes, with two medium spikes at the opposite end of its mid-section and 2 small spikes closer to its head. The colorful part of the spider is also narrow and elongated, rather than the wide circle seen in many of the pictures on your site. Do you think this is the same kind of spider or are there similar types? I wondered if this might be a juvenile and perhaps the proportions change as they grow? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
hanks!
Gina Allen, NC
..

9 September, 2003:
I found this in my yard. Can't figure it out. Looks like a spinybacked orbweaver, but don't know for sure. Can you help??? Fist picture of 3.
Thanks,
Bob

16 September, 2003:
Reply:
These spiders look like arrow shaped micrathena.

 

..
9 September, 2003: Hi there,
We snapped this photo this past weekend at Killbear Provincial Park, in central Ontario. It was hiding underneath the fly on our tent, and was roughly 1 -2 inches long. After doing some digging around, we think it might be a wolf spider, but we're wondering if anyone can
tell us for sure...

Thanks!
..
9 September, 2003:
Being a photography major here in Missouri, I couldn't pass up the opportunity of photographing these spiders. I know absolutely nothing about spiders, but I do know that the "leaf spider" photograph is actually a
Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver, the other, I have no idea. If you could help me identify it I would be appreciative. Are they harmless? Can you refer me to a site that can help me out on learning more about them? And, I love you site. I jumped when I felt something "crawl' on me LOL! I really do not like spiders all that much and that was a little disturbing, but I'm okay :). Thanks and feel free to use these photo's if you would like. Hopefully they will be in my school gallery soon ;).

..
8 September, 2003:
Could you please tell me what type of spider this is? I live in Eastern Michigan in the USA. Thanks for your time,
Ruthann

..
Reply: This one looks like a garden orb weaver.
7
September, 2003:
Hi. We found this spider in our yard a few days ago and haven't ever seen one like it. We visited your page and saw a picture from southern California that looks a lot like it. We're in southern Ohio. If anyone can identify this, we'd appreciate hearing about it. Thanks.
Mitch and Jo Shaw

..
Reply: The unidentified spider, pictured on Sept 7th, looks to be a brown widow. If the person who took the picture happens to live in Florida, then the chances are even higher that it is a brown widow.
Kingdom: Metazoa ((=Animalia) multicellular animals)
Phylum: Arthropoda (arthropods)
Class: Arachnida (spiders, harvestmen, scorpions, mites, etc.)
Order: Araneae (spiders)
Family: Theridiidae (cobweb weavers)
Genus: Latrodectus (widow spiders)
Species: Latrodectus geometricus
Common Names: Brown Widow

..
7 September, 2003:
My husband came upon this spider and we have never seen such a thing before. It has a large abdomen and the top is white on the top and yellow towards  the lower surface of the top. The bottom side has two yellow stripes down  it. The legs are black and yellow striped. What do I have and is it poisonous? I have attached two pictures one of the top side and one of the bottom side.
Thank you, Meg.

..
5 September, 2003:
Hi,
I have attached some photos of a spider that I have been trying to identify without much luck. There are about eight of these in a bush in our yard - each guarding egg sacs. We live in Philadelphia. My daughters and I have been watching them for several weeks now. We would love to identify them (before they hatch!). I hope you enjoy the pictures!
Thanks, Dan
Nice photos, click for a larger view.

Hi Glenda,
Someone just identified the spiders in the pictures I sent you the other day. The spiders are Basilica Orb Weavers (Mecynogea lemniscata). Information was found on this site - http://www.floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Mecynogea_lemniscata
Thanks again - great site! Dan

..
3 September, 2003: Glen, first of all I have to say I love your site. I ran across it when trying to identify the spider in front of my house in Reno, NV, pictures of which are attached. So far I have been unable to find anything about it. This one seems unusual because of its bright-orange color and the bright-yellow "horns" which you can see protruding in the posterior picture.] Unfortunately I don't have the best camera. I would love to know what it's called. Also, do you know of any "spider encyclopedia" on the web that covers North American species?
Appreciate a

..
1 September, 2003:
hey there
we saw your website and wanted to see if you could help us id this spider found on our couch upon cleaning. its pretty small, its the size of a small finger nail. if you need more info please send questions
thanks for your time
sheri

..
20 August, 2003:
You have a great web site. Can you help identify 2 of the following I found after hosing down the eaves of the house? (I know the 3rd photo is a Black Widow which I found in our garage.)

..
20 August, 2003:
Glen,
A friend took these pictures last weekend in a relatives house in Southern  Texas. He couldn't stay there any longer.
We thought it was a Huntsman spider like this one in the link but the markings are all wrong and he was in southern texas not florida. Can you post the following pictures, We searched the internet forever and couldn't find a definite match.
Thanks,
DAVE
Reply: I would say it is a huntsman, the size and shape indicate that it would be. Any other ideas from anyone? Giant crab spider is another name for them.

Reply: The unidentified spider from Texas seen hiding behind a wall clock is likely a Giant Crab spider( Heteropoda venatoria (L.),). We have them in Florida, too... pretty much all the spiders here are that big... I would have left the house, too!

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14 August, 2003:
Here's a couple of shots - of a spider that builds the web each night and tears it down - leaves only the anchor strands. He/she is munching on something they caught. quite large spider.

Rosalie Wolfe
Foley, Alabama

Reply: This one looks like a Garden Orb Weaver 

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6 September, 2003
More info: Hi, I can identify the spider that Mike said was a "Scorpion Killer", it is  actually called a Whip Scorpion (Tanzanian Giant Tailless) - Damon  variegatus. I used to live in South Africa and we used to play with them as children, there where hundreds of them under our pool pump cover. They are harmless (but do pinch) and run very quickly sideways, sort of like  a crab and they like the dark, and fit into small spaces. I love them!! great pictures too.
Keep up the good work:)
Usha Thorp
Here's a link to some more info on this whip scorpion sent in by Usha Thorp http://centralpets.com/pages/critterpages/insects/other_insects/BUG4334.shtml
5 September, 2003
Reply: Hi Glen, this is Tiffany Honrada. I was looking at the picture of the spider that Mike sent in on the 11th of August, the one eating the lizard in Mexico. It looks like a tail-less whipspider or whipscorpion to me. They are rare in areas like Mexico, but have been seen on occasion. There are several different types of these spiders/scorpions(have not been able to determine which they are yet), but here are two pictures of the Tanzanian kind that look similar to that which is shown in Mike's picture. This is my best guess! If you read about them and look at them, they are very interesting creatures. Sort of like a cross between a spider and scorpion. This could be why they are called scorpion killers. They have two really long legs that are like whips and help in capturing their prey.If you look at Mike's photo, you can see the legs on the spider/scorpion. At first I thought it was a crack in the ground but then realized that it was part of the spider. These are also a spider/scorpion collectors dream to have and can be sold for a pretty good price if caught, which usually does not happen due to their speed. Thanks again for your site, its always nice to learn some new info about spiders!
Take care,
Tiffany

11 August, 2003:
Hello,
Can you help me identify this spider? The photo was taken August 2003 while we were vacationing in Central Mexico. One night after dinner the owner of the home we were staying at went downstairs to check something and a few minutes later calls up "Anyone want to see a spider eating a lizard?" Of course, we all run down and there is this spider in a corner of a storage room with gecko in its jaws! The monster was about the size of a man's hand - 10" or so across - with the legs extending out even farther. He told us the name in Spanish, which I have forgotten, and said they are known as "scorpion killers". Incredible.

Mike

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11 August, 2003:
Hi,

Saw this in Algonquin Provincial Park. Ontario, Canada in July/Aug. Wondered what type of spider it is.

Marc Jones

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10 August, 2003:
My daughter found this on my living room floor in Oklahoma. Can you guy tell me what this is, it looks like a wolf spider?

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10 August, 2003:
I have a spider that I cannot identify. I just saw this spider at a friends house and it landed on her face but she brushed it off. Can you please tell me what kind of spider this is? I have 3 pictures as attachments enclosed.

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9 August, 2003:
Dear Glen,
I have found this spider on my house or should I say about 27 and counting of these spiders. (That is all I counted) I took several pictures of the mama spider she had children around her.
Please find out for me.

Reply:
Looks a bit like a marbled orb weaver:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/clinic/Bugofwk/965460/marbspid.htm

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2 December, 2003:
Reply: This a Tegenaria spec.. Im from Germany and we've them in every house all over the country (we call them house-spider or house-corner-spider). The problem with these spiders is the fact that in Germany Tegenaria domestica lives in the houses. Theyre harmless. In America Tegenaria agrestis lives in the houses, their venom causes much more damage to the tissue than the venom of T. domestica. Here in Germany T. domestice keeps T. agrestis out of the houses, I don't know how. I don`t know any report about an encounter of the third kind between the hobo (T. agrestis) and humans in Germany. T. agrestis here only lives in forests and quarries. But in America the hobo was introduced bevor the T. domestica so they could spread all over North-America in houses.
The one on the picture is definitive a Tegenaria spec., but I can't say exactly if it is a domestica or an agrestis. They only differ in size and details that can`t be seen on a photo like the one on your side, sometimes agrestis is lighter than domestica. Because the one on the photo seems to me very small (comparison to the coin - I`ve seen a T. domestica with a leg-span of nearly 9cm - the one on the photo!) I would say its a hobo-spider.

Felix Hug
8 August, 2003:
Hi,
I have been visiting your page periodically and identifying some of the spiders I find around my Calgary, Alberta home (basement suite). Over the past summer months, I have caught or killed almost a dozen spiders identical or similar to the one shown in the attached photos. I haven't found a photo on your website that shows a spider identical to these ones. What worries me (and I don't worry easily), is that in my searching I found out about Hobo spiders. These spiders are apparently found in my neck of the woods, and the effects of their bite is virtually the same as that of a Brown Recluse spider. Closely examine the photo I supplied and compare it with that shown here, do these look close enough to each other to justify my worry? Also, these guys are fast and difficult to catch - I sometimes have to spray them with a cleaning chemical to daze them enough to catch them. They have been running across my living room and bedroom floors quite often. According to descriptions of their behavior, this seems on par. Recently, a fellow in Edmonton (300km north of us) was bitten by a spider, supposedly a Brown Recluse, and the effects of that bite are shown in the other two attached photos. Knowing that Brown Recluse spiders do not exist north of the mid-US, I have to wonder if this wasn't from a Hobo instead.
Please let me know what you think,
Gerad

 

Photo sent in by Felix - Tegenaria domestica

Gerad's spider

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8 August, 2003:
Very nice web page. Lots of pics. Keep up the good work.
Tonight I felt a sting on the back of my neck and swatted this spider off. The sting started out the size of a flea bite. Now, 3 hours later it's almost gone. Do you know what kind it is?
Thanks
Keith
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8 August, 2003:
Hi,
 I have a question. What do you make of this one? I let her go without making a formal i.d. My opinion is "wolf spider," but I'm not sure what kind. This one was on my back porch in North Carolina, USA. That's a backlighted .5 inch grid she is sitting on.  You're welcome to use this image if you like. I've already put it on Wikipedia with a tentative i.d. as Lycosa sp. Thanks.
Patrick Moran
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7 August, 2003:
Here is a couple of pics of what I believe to be a Carolina Wolf Spider (Lycosa carolinensis). I found the spider being dragged along the ground behind my home in south Mississippi (US), by a large wasp. The spider had obviously been stung and was barely moving when I chased the wasp off and collected the fine specimen. It is one of the largest spiders I have ever seen in this area. The spider, unfortunately, has expired, but now has a home among a collection of naturalist items (animal skulls, fish bones, etc) I have been finding over the years. I am considering purchasing some clear resin and attempting to preserving the spider. If you would like to add the photos to the collection please do so.
Regards,
David Grantham

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4 August, 2003:
Hello,
I found your website and could not find a match for this spider. They are approximately 1"-2'" in diameter and seem to always in appear in my Southern California yard in August. I have found three separate spiders making webs between the trees at night around our outside light fixtures. The underside belly markings are quite unique. What is it ?
 

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23 July, 2003:
I would like to know if anyone can identify this spider. I've never seen any like it. It was found hanging from it's web on the side of my van in the evening after a very hot day in Alberta Canada. When approached with a string it became very aggressive and at one point bit the string and held on.
Thanks,
Jeff

Reply: This is a Goldenrod Spider  (Misumena vatia)
http://www.yahooligans.com/content/animals/species/3696.html for more information - thanks to Dawn in California, USA 
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23 July, 2003:
I was recently up on the North Shore of Lake Superior in Minnesota and I was out taking some pictures. I came across this colorful, yet strange "spider". At least I think it is a spider. I haven't been able to find any other pictures of anything like this one. I have attached a photo I took of it. I think it my be related to the drab spiders, based on what I have seen and read on the websites suggested by your site. If you have any idea what it is I would love to know. Thanks
Rachel Hawkins
New Hope, Minnesota
Photo taken July 16, 2003, Lutsen, Minnesota along the shore of Lake Superior

Reply: Both this and the one above look very similar and are probably some sort of crab spider.

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23 July, 2003:
Hi! My name is Sandra and I live in North Carolina. I found a spider hanging from my son's basketball net. I was looking through your photos attempting to identify it and found a picture submitted by "John" on June 30 of a spider he found in South Carolina. This spider has the same odd marking on it's underside. I think it may be a Southern House Spider, but they are often confused with the Brown Recluse. I can not find any mention of the marking though in either. Can you help?
Thanks!
Sandra Williams

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2 December, 2003:
Reply: This spider is much too massive for being a Tegenaria. It looks more like a member of the Lycosidae-family (Wolf-spiders).
Felix Hug
22 July, 2003:
Hello! You have a really educational website, which I very much enjoyed! I was hoping to ID a spider my room mate and I found in our kitchen. If you would be kind enough to help us ID the spider, we'd appreciate it! My initial guess is that it's either something from the Wolf spider family, or maybe something in the Tegenaria family (Tegenaria gigantea maybe?) We are located in Huntsville, Alabama.

Thanks!
Dave

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17 July, 2003:
I found this spider (photo attached) on our kitchen sink cabinet, which is 5 times the size of the average spiders I've seen around our house. Then a few minutes later, I found our kitten playing with another one a few feet outside the kitchen (yike!) I had to chase her around a bit, as she ran away with it in her mouth (unfortunately for the spider, is the other one in the photo). What are they? Are they poisonous? How to we keep them OUT OF OUR HOUSE? I wonder if there are more that our kitten and cat have taken care of before. Thank you.
starfish1@hotmail.com

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12 July, 2003:
Hi, I'm Dannie Davis from Barksdale Air Force Base, La. We found this spider in our hall way and I took a couple of pics of it. I've seen them before but, they're were much larger... At least 3-4 times bigger............


Attached is the pic of it next to a penny....

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12 July, 2003:
Hi Glenda. :o) Thanks for responding so quickly and also for identifying that spider for me. It is obvious from the mouse spider page that my arachnid is a male mouse spider. I have another photo of him...he was a particularly cranky fellow and was not happy with my macro lens being so close to him, as this photo shows. You can also see the spines on his front legs that he must use for holding his prey while he sinks those big fangs into them. What a way to go.
Thanks again for your help.
Kind regards Wal.

12 July, 2003:
Hi. hope this mail is getting to the right person. If not could you please forward it along to the right place.. thanks
I have attached a pic of an 8-legged fang carrier found in western qld Aust. It was on the ground...please tell me what kind it is. Thanks,
Wal

Reply: Looks like a mouse spider? Click for a larger view.

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10 July, 2003:
Found on my barn floor and standing on its rear haunches to display its large red fangs and 3" diameter legs and body. He/She now resides out back in a safe old wood pile. Jon Miller

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Reply: 1st spider is a jumping spider and the other 2 are Gasteracanthae.
10 July, 2003:
Hi there,
I just saw your website, lots of info! I am trying to figure out the names of two spiders we saw in Port Douglas, would you by any chance know these two?
Thanks,
Jen
Jennifer Papenfuss, CMP
http://www.marketingedgesf.com

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10 July, 2003:
Reply: The photo contributed by Carol on July 8, 2003 is a female "Gasteracantha cancriformis" (spinybacked orbweaver).
http://floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Gasteracantha_cancriformis
http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/beneficial/g_cancriformis.htm
Josh Hillman, FloridaNature.org

8 July, 2003:
Hello, as with your other viewers, I loved this site. My daughter sent me an image of what looks like to be the Jewelled Spider (Gasteracantha Minax), however the color is different. Could you email me and let me know what to tell her. I'm including her email to you because it is funny to read. I'm also going to include the spider image. Thanks for your worthwhile site.
Regards, Carol

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8 July, 2003:
Hello,
We found this fella on the air conditioner and have been trying to figure out what it is. Based on your site, we think its a wolf spider but still unsure. Could you please give your opinion? Thank you!

Kim
Novi, MI, United States

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7 July, 2003:
Hi:

We live in the Sacramento, CA area and are continually finding the enclosed spiders in our house much to the dismay of my wife. I would appreciate if there is anything you could tell me about it this species. I'm thinking it's a Huntsman or Wolf variety. They are always found on the ground

Thank You,
Russell Gruber
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3 July, 2003:
This is a photo that I took in Freedom, Maine. I was wondering how this  spider captured this ant. I looked
around for a web and couldn't find one?  Do you suppose that the ant was just walking along the blade of grass and
was snatched by this spider? Do you know what this spider is? Thanks Sue
PS Awesome website.

Reply: Looks like some sort of a crab spider which doesn't make a web but lies in wait in the plants for its prey. 

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30 June, 2003: I found these two spiders in my swimming pool that I had drained to clean. Can you help me identify them and maybe tell me if they are dangerous?

Paul Diakos
pdiakos@gt.rr.com

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30 June, 2003: I saw a bunch of unknown spiders on your webpage and was wondering if you ever saw a spider like this one .... attached is a picture of a furry spider I saw on my front door porch in South Carolina . If you know what it is please e-mail me back so I can relax some , For now I will Assume its poisonous.
ty John.

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30 June, 2003: I have never seen a spider carrying babies
like that. Is this a "normal" thing? and also do you know what kind of spider this might be?
Thanks
Sue
Reply: Looks like a wolf spider with her babies and this is how she looks after them. Quite amazing, isn't it??

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27 June, 2003:
Reply:
 The spider camouflaged against the bark in the photo submitted by Chris on June 20, 2003 is Dolomedes albineus -- whitebanded fishing spider:
http://floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Dolomedes_
albineus
,
Josh Hillman, FloridaNature.org
20 June, 2003:
You have a fascinating page and very informative. I'm attaching a photo of a spider found on a tree in my yard in Lincoln, Virginia. I'm guessing based on photos found on your site that it is some type of Wolf or Huntsman spider. The camera does not adequately capture the "death's head" appearing on the abdomen. But visually it is quite distinctive and visible when viewing the spider. That is actually what attracted my attention to it in the first place.
Thanks for your site and the work you put into it.
Chris
 

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18 June, 2003:
What sort it this?
Rolf Bjornert

Reply: It looks like some sort of crab spider.
Theresa Cross
 

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24 June, 2003:
Reply: The fuzzy spider with the bright red abdomen that "Belinda" posted on your web site on June 18 is a jumping spider. Looking in Golden's "Spiders and their kin" on page 103: It seems likely that it is a Phidippus johnsoni.
Theresa Cross
18 June, 2003:
We have found an interesting spider in our backyard. It was dead, but our neighbor caught his brother alive. We've attached a picture. Looks a lot like the one Stacey Copeland found back in July, 2002. It has green fangs...
We live in Gilbert, AZ. Anyone know what it is? Someone thought it may be a mutated version of a black widow.

Belinda
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16 June, 2003:
This is the strangest spider I've see. Can you identify it? It was found on the door of an equipment cabinet at an oil pump station near Conroe, TX.

Thanks
Charlotte

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Reply:  This one also looks like the Camel spiders below.
13 June, 2003:
Hello. My sister and I found this spider in my office. We live in the Western United States, just near Los Angeles, California in the Kern County area. I was wondering if you could spare a bit of your genius to help us identify this spider. I have attached scanned images of this (dead) spider.

Thank you,

Jeremy D LaLonde
jeremyl@westec.org

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16 July, 2003
More info:

Hi.
I submitted an unidentified spider pic and you posted it for me on June 4 (P Ellis). I received almost 200 emails from others (from California to Massachusetts & Canada...I'm in Michigan) who had found the same one and wanted to know if I had found out more info.  Well, I DID! I really enjoyed answering all the emails but, since I was using someone else's email address they suggested I get back in here and post my findings for everyone. So, here's what I learned:  It seems it is a Regal Jumping Spider or Phidippud Audax. Colors & marks can vary a bit, can bite, NOT poisonous (though possibly a problem to allergy-prone people), jump and/or rear up at you when you go at them,... I was told by one "expert" that they are loners BUT, after my 1st one I found 2-3 a day for about a month (babies maybe).  I was also informed by one BRAVE spider finder that she found them to be quite tame & that she was able to have them jump from one hand to the other!  But, 99% of the emails I received were from people just like me...FREAKED OUT and wondering what they were!  So, I hope this info helps more people. Thanks for posting my pic. Finding more info & knowing I wasn't alone really helped me feel better! Also, helpful info site on that spider is:
http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol3num2/centerfold/phidippus.html
Thanks!
Steff
(Any other questions please email me at: sieo@peoplepc.com)
4 June, 2003:
Can you help? Found "dead" in shower, scooped up, photographed (thinking of you site), jarred her up for keeping "specimen" to share, checked on her later, she's alive & well!!! I know where there's one...there's a hundred! I'm freaking out! What is it? Jumping spider? Harmless? (yeah right!) Regardless of venom or whatever I'm freaking out! It is the BIGGEST black, hairy, scary looking spider I've ever seen! Can you let me know????? Thanks so much! GREAT SITE!!!
P Ellis
sieo@peoplepc.com

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2 June, 2003
I found this spider crawling on the floor in my living room.. I live in Va, USA... I have two small (medium to small) dogs... I haven't seen this kind of spider before... I'm sending two pictures... pic 1 is 4 small pics from 1x to 4x zoom of the spider and it show the colors reddish brown and tan.. pic 2 in the size next to a penny, and better view of the colors, also a zoom of what I think is the spiders fang... I think it kinda big for a spider this size... can you tell me what kind of spider this is...? thanks
King

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May, 2003:
Could you give some advice on to the type of spider this may be? It is in my back yard in Webster Texas. I have 3 small children and do not know if I need to be concerned or not. Thanks for your time

Tia Siems
281-286-9902

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27 June, 2003:
Reply:
The spider in the 4 photos dated May 28, 2003 by John might be the giant lichen orbweaver, Araneus bicentenarius:
http://floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Araneus_bicentenarius Josh Hillman, FloridaNature.org
28 May, 2003:
We found this spider in our San Antonio, Texas yard. It's about 3 to 3 1/2 inches long.
Thanks
John
Reply: Looks like an Orb Weaver.

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Here Is a picture of a Camel Spider. My husband found this in Kuwait I know they're not around here but I thought it might be interesting for you to put on your site anyway! This one was just a baby too the smallest seen! I also wanted to know if you identified that spider entered on June 4th from someone! it was on your site under Unidentified spiders. It was black with a white diamond on its back. I also killed one of those found in my house in OR. If you could let me know what kind you think it is and any other info on it I would appreciate it! Also my daughter was bit on her ankle by a spider and it s starting to blister up its been two days. what do you think I should do about that? Thanks Stephanie Sperling
mom_ofthree_happily@yahoo.com
Reply: Please contact your doctor about any reactions from a spider bite!!

Linda has had 26 responses to her query about the Solfugid  (Wind spider, Sun spider, Camel spider). Click here to read some of them.
Here's some more photos of them: http://mamba.bio.uci.edu/~pjbryant/biodiv/spiders/Solifugid.htm

22 May, 2003
Can you tell me what spider this is? I have found 3 in two days. One outside and two inside my home. I live in the High Desert of Southern California, USA. Apple Valley, California. I forgot to tell you it has 10 legs.
My email is linda.stgermain2@verizon.net
Thank you,
Linda St. Germain

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23 May, 2003:
I took this photo in Bali, Indonesia a while back, and having just come across it I'd like to find out what it is. It seems to be similar to a golden orb spider, but I'm sure someone knows exactly! I class myself as an arachnophobe, but I managed to spend more than an hour looking at your website - great stuff!

Regards,
Ed.
email: edwardgrigson@hotmail.com

8 August, 2003:
Reply: This one is called a long-jawed orb weaver (tetragnatha). Patrick Moran

 

  

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22 May, 2003:
I have a photo my husband took that I would like to send you - you can publish it or otherwise (I don't care what you do with it) I would just like to know what it is. It was HUGE and I'm afraid  there may be a nest of these and that they could be dangerous to us and our children.

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27 June, 2003:
Another Reply from Josh Hillman, FloridaNature.org: 
The spider shown in a tangled web dated May 13, 2003 by Deborah is a female southern house spider, Kukulcania hibernalis:
http://floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Kukulcania_hibernalis
http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/urban/spiders/southern_house_spider.htm
A reply on May 22 incorrectly identified the spider as the brown recluse, Loxosceles reclusa. Information on the few venomous spiders in Florida can be found here: Venomous Spiders in Florida
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us/~pi/enpp/ento/venomousspiders.htm
15 June, 2003:
Another Reply:
The picture posted on 13 May 2003 by Deborah is a filistid, or tanglefoot spider. I have these in my house. They're very interesting in  that they have a special structure (crebellum?) used to comb out loops  in the web, which they use rather than sticky silk to capture prey.  They're quite harmless, and I enjoy feeding them.
barb
Deborah's Reply: Actually - I'm pretty sure it's a female Kukulcania spider. It's got the distinguishable web that looks like heavy cob webs and lives high up in a crack in the wall - I believe the brown recluse would be lower to the ground and doesn't have this web. I think we're pretty safe.
Thanks
Deborah.
22 May, 2003:
Reply:

Hi Glen, my name is Tiffany Honrada. I live in Fort Walton Beach, FL. I was browsing your site and came upon the Unidentified spiders page. I saw the picture that "Deborah" sent in on May 13, 2003 and recognized it immediately. It's a Brown Recluse spider. I have done a lot of research on these spiders and would like to warn her to not go near it, they are very dangerous. I posted in your guestbook, but was afraid you would not see the message. Please, if you have a way to contact her, tell her to stay away from it and inform her landlord or super of the spider because there may be more! I' m sure you know that these spiders are extremely dangerous if tampered with (ie. maintenence men, weather, etc.) I mean, they are nearly impossible to extinguish with pesticides, but I figured I could at least let her know so she would not go near one or try to handle it. I believe it is a female, but I cannot tell clearly enough by the picture. There is still a high risk of it breeding and multipying despite the gender, which is NOT A GOOD THING, so if you could pass on the message for me that would be great! Also, I've attached a few pictures of the most common look of the brown recluse spiders found in the US. Thank you so much and have a great day!
Sincerely,
Tiffany Honrada
P.S. Love the site!!

Reply: This is a female Southern House Spider - glen
13 May
, 2003:
Hi - Please find attached a picture of a spider that's been living in the hallway outside my apartment for the last year. It went in to hibernation for the winter and now it's back - bigger than ever. It's up in a corner on the stairwell. She built a huge web for the winter - which was more like a cocoon than a web and we cleared it away at the start of the summer to see if she was still in there. She never seems to leave the little corner and doesn't have a big web to catch food but is definitely getting bigger. We're beginning to think it might be dangerous but I love spiders and don't want to disturb her!!!
Thanks
Deborah.
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27 June, 2003:
Reply: The spider in the two photos submitted by Neil on May 8, 2003 appear to be the northern black widow, Latrodectus variolus (not to be confused with the southern black widow, Latrodectus mactans). Latrodectus variolus is black with a row of red spots down the middle of the abdomen and has a "broken" red hourglass. Latrodectus mactans has a complete red hourglass and a single red spot on the back of the abdomen on the opposite side of the spinnerets from the hourglass.
Josh Hillman, FloridaNature.org

16 April, 2004:
Another Reply:
The spiders are black widows. They are commonly called the northern
widow. They have red dots or bars on the back in addition to the  underside red hourglass marking. From what i gather, they are just as  poisonous as the commonly known southern black widow.
P.S. I have found the northern species in Indiana.

8 May, 2003:
Hello,
I would love some help identifying these spiders living under the rocks in my back yard. Do you think they are black widows?
thanks

..
2 May, 2003:
Hi,
My name is Lou and I'm a photographer from Nottingham in the UK. I was lucky enough to have spent three months in the Perth area last year. I came across a spider resting on a Banksia nut with a black body and red legs and was wondering if you could identify it for me and tell me a little about it. I am sending you a photo which may help.
Many thanks
Lou

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28 April, 2003:
I found this one curled up in one of my elephant ear plants (Slidell, LA). I searched for various types, recluses and leaf curlers among them, and none seem to match. I didn't see this one on your site, hoping you could tell us what this one is. It's about 2-3 inches and moves very fast. I would appreciate any help. My kids love to see all the different kinds of spiders you have, especially the big ones!

Thank you,
Renee

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29 April, 2003:
Reply:

Hi there. LOVE YOUR SITE!! I can identify the spider from Mirjam and Michel from Switzerland. That is a "Giant crab spider" Heterpoda Venatoria. I have one right now that I'm keeping. They're common here in Florida. From the looks of it, it's a male. They're non-poisonous, but do give a painful bite if provoked. They're also EXCELLENT pest control! cockroaches, beetles,etc. You can find more info here. Rocky
http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/urban/spiders/giant_crab_spider.htm
27 April, 2003:
Hello
We've found a spider in our holidays on the maledivs. Can you tell us please  what kind a spider this is? Thank you for your help. We've visited your  homepage, but we couldn't see this kind a spider.
Kind regards,
Mirjam and Michel from Switzerland
From what I could see, these are also known as Huntsmen spiders.
glen
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 30 April, 2003:
Reply:
The photo directly to the right of this message is a "Silver garden orbweaver" Argiope argentata They're found in the southern part of Florida. Rocky
18 March, 2003:
Hello ,
Great site ! Here are several pics for you to post of several species I have found here in southeast Florida. I haven't identified the crab spider or the selenopid type one yet. I also have several other pics of spiders and scorpions.
Guy E Crauwels

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8 March, 2003:
Dear Glen, Below is a pic of a translucent green spider who "sproing-ed" up onto a bowl of water/food coloring that my 6 yr. old and I were performing flower hydroponic experiments in. He seemed to have misjudged the distance on his first jumping attempt and bounced off. On his second attempt he landed nimbly on the rim of the plastic bowl and proceeded to "bow up" and commence with some pretty obnoxious posturing in a seeming effort to drive us off. He has reddish black eyes, possibly 8 +, he is bright, translucent green, is very small <1/2 inch at the most>, and very aggressive. If he travelled from the grass in the yard he must have tread about 5 to 6 feet of concrete. But my daughter and I had cuttings and weed roots and the heads of wild violets with us at the time which may have served as quick and easy transit. Any idea who our visitor and fellow day-scientist might be?
Thank you so very much,
Wendy and Faith in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
PS-We've had a lot of rain and it has been chilly. It is normally very muggy here. = a climate reference.
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7 March, 2003:
I found your site while trying to identify a recent visitor to my garden. It definitely didnt look like a local and I suspected it was an Ozzie overstayed. I took your sites recommendation and visited the Queensland Museum site to discover that this is a Two spined spider (Poecilopachys australasiae). Its off to MAF however to confirm identification. As you site didnt have a photo of this colourful creature I thought your kids would appreciate one (and knowing that spiders can travel quiet far).
Hel Loader - Auckland, New Zealand
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11 January, 2003:
I don't expect much identification is possible, except that it's probably a trapdoor spider of some kind. But here goes: Camping in the bush just west of Nyngan, NSW, I noticed holes in the ground around the place. I just happened to look at one at dusk, and saw two tiny legs just below the surface. Walking past the hole too loudly sent the spider back down it's hole, but a bit of patience had the legs reappearing. It was too dark to see anything else, but a flash photo revealed this spider. The hole was just under 1 centimetre across. By dawn the next morning, the spider had covered its hole with web. The photo doesn't do this web justice, but it was beautifully smooth and looked airtight. Looking around, there were several old covers up to four or five millimetres thick with dust and stones that had fallen into the holes. Obviously the webs do a great job of keeping things out during the day. I guess the web also keeps hungry ants out! One thing that surprised me was the lack of web around the holes. I thought that spiders like this used a network of web around the hole to feel insects walking past. Maybe they just have a very good sense of vibration.
Regards
Stephen Cowling

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6 January, 2003:
I saw all the postings that people put up on your site... so I figured I'd include my own discovery. I can't seem to identify this one, although it's exactly the same spider that Todd sent in on Dec 23rd, 2002. This spider is just nursing it's babies right outside of my apt complex... I guess until they're all grown up and ready to leave the nest. I included a solo shot & another with the nest. Please, anyone, help identify.

Pedro

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