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Spider Photos 2004 (2)
Here's Page 2 of some unidentified spider photos sent in by viewers from 2004. Please choose a section below.
Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    

UNIDENTIFIED SPIDERS 2004 (2)

Reply: This is a camel spider or solfugid. They are common in the drier areas.

25 December, 2004:
hi
i use vue print to open attch. i found this spider dead on the floor what is it .i hope you can open the attch. i live in Las Vegas can you help me??
thank you

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Reply: I found a little info on the spider I was asking about (below) in case you would like to replay it. Here is a link which shows more pictures of it: http://bugguide.net/node/view/2006 It's a Jumping Spider.
21 December, 2004:
Aloha from Hawaii.... I just was wondering if you guys had any clue on the spider I just found. I was cleaning some grapes for my son when I saw a white sack. I kind of knew that it was a spider so i put it in a container and when I moved it around it poped out. It may be a spider from the mainland but I never seen one in Hawaii. Well if you can please let me know . thank you, Piilani P.S. it has some orange spots on its back and on its legs.

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6 December, 2004:
Hallo!
I Happened across this one in Liberia and I thought it looked a bit scary! Could you tell me what this is?
Michael Waara
Sweden

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28 November, 2004:
Found Nov 28 2004 at Conway Sc body about 1 and 1/4 inch long 1/2 in wide legs about 2 in long. any idea what type spider this is?

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26 November, 2004:
Hi Glen,
Is there any way you could help me and try to identify this spider? It is just the hugest spider I have ever seen! I live in Rock Hill, South Carolina. I have been living here for 12 years and the largest spider I have seen has been the Wolf Spider. I have never seen this spider before, and I hope I never do! This guy doesn't look anything like a wolf spider. If anything, he looks like a tarantula! Yuck! I was in awe of how huge his lower body is. I opened up my back door last night to put out the cat food, and there he was sitting next to my cat. I think even my cat was impressed with the spiders size. It was night time, and I leave the back light on, so I frequently see spiders hanging around trying to catch the bugs that are attracted to the porch light. To give you an idea of the spider's size, I'd say he would have taken up most of my palm, and his lower region had to have been close to an inch. Thanks for your help, Sheri

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23 November, 2004:
I found this not so little guy in the
ground while digging a ditch. I live in North Carolina. It looks like some type of a funnel web??? I would love to know what species it is.

Sincerely,
David DeKort

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Reply: That is a species of Micrathena, possibly Micrathena gracilis. It is not dangerous. Nathan Hepworth

5 November, 2004:
Hi: My name is Victor Carpizo, I photographed this weird specimen near Mexico City and I would like to know if it´s dangerous. Best Regards,

Victor Carpizo

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Reply: That is an orbweaver, possibly a species of  Araneus or Zygiella. It's not dangerous. Nathan Hepworth

1 November, 2004:
I saw this spider at a local gas station, approx. 50-75 feet from the Fox River in Northern Illinois, coming out of a garbage can...It is (was, sorry) approx. 1"-1.5" in diameter. I am just curious as I have never seen anything like this before. So if you can, pleas ID it for me!!? Thanks!!!
James Watrach
Internet Sales Manager
JimW@EFabPCB.com

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1 November, 2004:
Hello..  My wife and myself just got stationed here in Kodiak, AK and were having a bit of trouble finding out what kind of spider this is.. We see it on our kitchen floor and hallway (both tiled) often. I keep flushing them because I don't know if they are dangerous or not. We've seen anywhere from 10-15 of them. I just keep flushing and a new one shows up the next night.. standing there in the middle of the kitchen floor like it's his kitchen. :) Anyway, if they are harmless I will stop flushing but I just didn't want harmful spiders moving from my kitchen up to my bedroom.  Here's the picture of him, sitting on a paper towel.

Reply: Can't name the species, but it's a wolfspider. It isn't  dangerous. Nathan Hepworth

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Reply: BE CAREFUL! That strongly resembles an older juvenile black
widow! It could have come in with the boat from California. If you still  have the spider, or can recall from memory--did it/ does it have a red  hourglass on its underside? If so, you have a black widow. Nathan Hepworth

28 October, 2004:
HI was hoping you could help identify this spider that was found in our shop in Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada. We had just finshed washing a boat purchased in Sacramento California and had left it in the shop for the night. The next morning we discovered this guy, we didn't recognize it as a local, Thanks

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Reply: That looks to be a male Tegenaria, a type of funnel weaver. I  don't know the species, but you'll want to be careful with it as you could  have the DANGEROUS hobo spider in your area, which is a species of  Tegenaria. The hobo spider has relatives that are not dangerous to people, but at least one species of those live in along side hobo spiders, and are  difficult to tell apart. So take no chances with an unidentified Tegenaria min the pacific Northwest!!! This site has a map of the hobo spider's range ( link to map is on the brown recluse page), as well as pictures and info: www.hobospider.org  Nathan Hepworth

 27 October, 2004:
HI.i have a question about spiders and i have 2 pictures of this spider (same spider different lighting) that i found in my washroom (surprisingly!) and it was pretty big...i mean not that big than the pictures u guys have on ur site buy bigger than ur
 normal everyday spider u usually spot around the house.. it was terrifying!  well I reside in Vancouver, British Columbia Canada to give u some detail where it's located...and it was dark brown and at lest 4 inches.. hopefully that'll be some help..... anyway I  would like to know what kind of spider this is, if it is dangerous, and where it originally came from...okay enjoy.... hehehe.. thanks......
.

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27 October, 2004:
Hi Glen,
This Spider was found floating in a pool in Calabasas California. I pulled up the articles below from a Website on Spiders... The photo  looks similar to the one in the article.
What kind of Spider is it? The one in my Photo is a little the worse for wear. Derek Gardner.

Reply: This is another of the same sort of myglamorph as below, and by the long pedipalps with the hook on them, a male too.

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25 October, 2004:
Hi Glen, can you tell me what type of spider this is. I have not seen this fellow before, it came out from under the fridge.
Thanks & Regards,
Bob Pearce
Queensland

Reply: It looks like a wolf spider.

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25 October, 2004:
I live in Nashville TN and have recently found 3 of these spiders in my house. I believe it is in the Mygalomorphae sub-order. I have found them just walking across the floor. I haven’t seen any webs or anything. Any ideas or if you think they are harmful. Thanks, Kinley Winchester
Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph as well. Could be harmful so be careful.

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25 October, 2004:
My daughter found this dead at the bottom of a swimming pool in San Diego California on October 23, 2004. Looks a lot like the one found In Baldwin Park on Oct 20, 2004.
Mike McNalley

Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph and by the long pedipalps with the hook on them, a male.


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Reply: That is Araneus trifolium, the shamrock spider. Nathan Hepworth

24 October, 2004:
My daughter found this spider in our driveway last Sunday. We have never seen anything like this before. What is it?  Julie

Reply: It looks like some sort of orb weaver, very unusual colouring!! Click for a larger view.

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Reply: This could also be Kukulcania hibernalis , the southern house spider. It was formerly classified as Filistata hibernalis. Nathan Hepworth

21 October, 2004:  
We found this spider in our lab. We are in Safford Arizona. The units show underneath the spider is centimeters. Could you help us identify it?

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Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph and by the long pedipalps with the hook on them, a male.

21 October, 2004:  
Hey, a I'm a student at the Art Institute of Los Angeles, and a couple of staff members that work on campus came across a very interesting breed of a spider. No one here can claim to have ever seen it before and when we researched online, we couldn't identify it with any of the photos or descriptions that were offered. The name of the files attached are what we called the spider, we found it amusing to name it after the real 'owner' who found it, Dario. He said to have come across it in Baldwin Hills which in California, floating dead in his pool. This happened today, October 20, around this afternoon. We hope to find out what exactly this type of spider is or if we indeed are so lucky to have found an entirely new breed. (Fingers crossed) You may contact Nanne at nsnow@edmc.edu - you might want to get a hold of her first, she's the staff member or even myself, at this address, the name's Vanessa. Thanks for your time, hope we're not wasting it, please give us an email back!

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Reply: Don't know the species, but it's a huntsman spider, ( Sparassidae ). It resembles the genus Heteropoda, and is probably about as  venomous--having a painful, but not dangerous bite. Nathan Hepworth

19 October, 2004:  
Hi, I am Daniel from Austria and I encountered this spider in a wooden shelter in the rainforests of Borneo (Kelabit Highlands, area of Bario) in Aug. 2004. Its body lenght excluding the legs was about 5-6 cm (2 inches or more) as far as I can remember. It seemed to be rather common and according to an indigenous hunter I was travelling with moderately poisonous. Can you help me identifying it? Thanks a lot and greetings to Australia, Daniel Hausknost.

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18 October, 2004:  
This little guy was under a foot stool in my backyard this morning. am i correct that it may be a brown widow spider? i would really appreciate you identifying it for me, thanks, sharon
Reply: Looks like it could be a brown widow.

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Reply: I would say this is a male+female pair of Kukulcania  Hibernalis, the southern house spider. The female is the larger, dark  colored one. Nathan Hepworth

16 October, 2004:  
Glen - I live in Las Vegas, NV, USA. There are several of these in my garage - they're up to 2" in diameter, dark brown on black, hairy, kind of shy and very fragile. I think they have four large eyes. They seem to be nocturnal, as they hide a few minutes after I turn on my garage light or open the garage door. I have had them come in my house (seems more common now in the fall) - one crawled up the back of my couch and over my arm - scared the bejeezus out of me. In one of the pics you see another kind of spider - not sure what it is…some kind of funnel spider? Light brown/caramel colored…lots of those too. Not sure if the big dark one was trying to prey on it. Anyway, a little stress and these things curl up and die - I chased the one in the picture around with the Bic pen to get it to pose for a picture, and two days later it was dead, never leaving this corner. They like dark corners and are usually *near* irregular webs, but I never see them in one - in one of the pics it seems to be tangled up in some webbing. What are they? Thanks,  Brian

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Reply: That looks like Phidippus apacheanus, a species of jumping  spider.  Nathan Hepworth

15 October, 2004:  
Hi I found this spider in my yard. I have never seen anything like it  before. Is it some sort of jumping spider, looking on your webpage, the  jumping spider is the only one that resembles it. Thanks
arvinielsen@hotmail.com

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14 October, 2004:  
Brown Recluse from Rogers, Arkansas
I found this one in one of my kids toys. In fact the same toy car that I found the Black Widow in which you posted a few months ago. Goes to show that if you keep toys outside it might be good to shake it a bit before letting the kids play.

Craig Richardson
Rogers Arkansas

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14 October, 2004:  
My name is Irish Jordan. I found this spider in my back yard.. thought I would send you a pic..  I think it is a black widow..
Thanks.

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Reply:  It looks like a Dolomedes scriptus, a species of fishing spider. Check these photos for confirmation: http://www.giffbeaton.com/spiders.htm
http://research.amnh.org/entomology/blackrock2/pictures/spider_images/galleries/
pisauridae/dolomedes_scriptus.htm

Nathan Hepworth

13 October, 2004:  
HI was wondering if you could identify a spider for me? I live in Raleigh NC and the was this Huge spider about 4" long ran across the floor in the house where I live. I trapped it with a ice tea pitcher and took this photo. I then took him to the end of the driveway and released him. I have been looking all over the net and still can not fine this spider. He looked like a skinny version of a Tarantula. Thanks Rodney. I have enclosed a pic.

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13 October, 2004:  
Hi I have an unidentified spider on my hands! I think that it is a fishing spider but am unsure of the species (after surfing the net for 3 hours!!!) If you or anyone out there could help identify it, that would be wonderful
;-) Please go ahead and post it on the site.
TIA, Dawn

Click for a larger picture.

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11 October, 2004:  
Hi there, I wonder if you can help. Whilst on a recent holiday to Sarawak Borneo we came across a lot of these spiders. They varied in size from approximately 1 inch to 2inches.  I have tried to look it up in various guide books but not yet identified it, the nearest I get is a Black widow, But this has whitish stripes as you can see. I thank you in anticipation for any help give. Kind Regards, Steve. P.S. please us photo freely.

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Reply: That is a wolf spider. I don't know the species, but  try searching Hogna carolinensis - Nathan Hepworth

10 October, 2004:  
Hi, I have seen about 10 of these spiders in the garage and now this one in my house. I live in Farwell Michigan, but just got home from Sturgis, South Dakota. I have never seen one around home like this before, could we have brought it home in the Motor home? I caught it in a jar and took these pictures. He is the size of a half dollar at least. Thanks
Karen

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10 October, 2004:  
Hello, I've been looking around your site to see if I could find something that looks like my captive. By the way, you have a wonderful site which I am very much enjoying. I caught this spider on Monday, October 4, 2004. Here's what I've observed about her type prior to her capture: I've seen many spiders form envelopes in the corners of the ceiling and moult. They move on to moult and molt again, approximately 4 to 6 times. I kill most that I see before they ever reach maturity but occasionally there is one I miss and it turns out to be a mature Black Widow, so I'm tending to think that's what she is, thought I haven't been able to locate any information about the life cycle of Black Widows or what an immature one in my area would look like, the eastern side of Washington State. I'm keeping her to see how she develops but would like to know any information about her that you can give me. I've affectionately named her Bella.
Thanks, C.L. Swiftot

Reply: You were right, that is an immature widow spider. I'm  not sure on the exact species though...It resembles the brown widow immature, which isn't supposed to be in your area, last I knew. Have a look at the "Common Spiders USA" page on the bar on the left hand side at the top of this page. Or it could be a widow that hasn't developed its black  coloration yet. Have a look at this page also -  Nathan Hepworth

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9 October, 2004:  
Great site, I have enjoyed going through all the pages.  I found both of these in my house, on the ground or under some furniture.  The black one was about penny-sized, and acted  pretty lethargic in the box but when I let him go outside he moved  faster than any spider I've seen before (extremely quick, jerky movements).  Funny thing is, I never noticed any colour other than black until I took a flash picture of his underside, as you can see  there appears to be a couple of red markings.   The brown spider was a bit larger, and didn't act as  aggressive when released.  I hope none of these are dangerous, since I let them go and I would prefer they not return.  Thanks a lot for your help,  Ben Sebastian

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Reply: I would say it's a Sparassidae huntsman spider. It  looks similar to Heteropoda venatoria, a North American huntsman spider.  Here is a picture of the male H.venatoria for comparison: http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/urban/spiders/giant_crab_spider01.htm  - Nathan Hepworth
8 October, 2004:
Hi everybody, what a great site.
I posted a pic of a quite large one i found in Bangkok, Thailand. If anybody knows what's it's name, i'd be very thankful. I believe it's crab or a hunting spider but i may be totally wrong. It still looks nice ....Size from left to
right about 10 cm.
greetings from berlin,
sebastian

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8 October, 2004:
hello again,
your site is still my favourite. love what you have done since I was here last. I have a question, I found a small spider in my laundry room on the wall. he is the size of a dime not counting his six legs, can you help? thank

Reply: The one  is a Parson Spider. It can be identified on this web site

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6 October, 2004:
Would love to know what this is. I did not see anything else like it on the website. Thanks.

Reply:  It looks like a Banana Orb Weaver, also known as the Golden Silk Spider. As far as I know their bites aren't a threat, just painful. Of course, an unexpected reaction could occur so don't go poking them to get bitten.

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6 October, 2004:
 Hi , I found this spider at the store where I work. He was shopping for shoes I think. He is about the size of a nickel and nobody liked him except me. I do not know if he is dangerous but I was careful when I snapped his picture. I dare say he even posed. I'm sorry to say the little guy wasn't a very good swimmer but he waved goodbye as he was circling the toilet bowl.

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Reply: It's a wolf spider of some sort. My best guess would be  what is listed as "Alopecosa inquilina? " on this website - http://www.xs4all.nl/~ednieuw/Spiders/Lycosidae/wolfspiders.htm - Nathan Hepworth.

6 October, 2004:

Hey I live in Oklahoma, and just found this spider in my garage. Now I am not positive it is native here, because I run a record label and I just got a box of cds from the manufacturing plant out in the east coast. The boxes came UPS so, theoretically, the spider could have come from ANYWHERE and just hitched a ride with the UPS guy. Here are two good pics of the spider. Lemme know if you know anything on it. Thanks jeremy

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Reply: That is a sac spider, probably the native yellow sac spider,  Cheiracanthium inclusum. The bite IS considered medically significant. Go to  www.hobospider.org for more information on these - Nathan Hepworth
 October, 2004:
 I'm thinking this an immature specimen - it's almost translucent with the exception of the
abdomen. This is the 4th one I've caught within the past week. Must've been a recent "sac hatch." I'll be laying in my bed and I'll see one of the little suckers out of the corner of my eye. Couldn't find a photo of this on the site to cross-reference. Is it a Brown Recluse? Eyes are too small to tell if there's only 6. I live in Boston, so a Recluse living up here isn't likely, right?

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reply: That looks like a trapdoor spider of some  kind. They aren't generally dangerous, but the bite will be more severe than  your average garden spider - Nathan Hepworth

5 October, 2004:
I am from South Texas and I found this aggressive spider in my babies nursery crawling across the floor, When we caught this spider and put it in an insect cage it would attack anything and everything. if anyone could help me identify it we sure would relief for our family, Thank you,
Brystolschultz34@aol.com

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4 October, 2004:
Attached are three pictures of a spider I found in my bathroom. The third picture is blurry, but includes a dime to show the size. Any help in identifying this spider would be helpful.

Thanks,
Rob Provost

Reply: That looks like it could be Dysdera crocata,  the woodlouse hunter too. Check out these links: Click here or here.
 

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3 October, 2004:
I found this guy behind my curtain right under my window sill. I live in the third floor of an apartment complex in Louisville KY. What is this thing?? Is it dangerous??

Reply: This one looks like a funnel weaver spider (Agelenopis species) which is a relative of the hobo spider.

Click here for  picture to compare.


 

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Reply: That is a mygalomorph, but not a tarantula. It could  be a trapdoor spider. While it's wouldn't be considered dangerous, you'd do well to avoid getting bitten. Trapdoor spider bites, from some species at  least, can be very painful. If you plan to keep it, provide it with a deep  bedding of moist, but not swampy dirt or peatmoss and keep it at or slightly
above room temp . The brownish red spots on its under side are its book  lungs.
Nathan Hepworth

1 October, 2004:
I know you don't identify spiders but maybe someone checking out you website can help me. I have looked everywhere trying to identify this spider its a ground spider
found under a piece of scrap siding no web. Its a little larger than a Quarter, but my husband said he killed one 4 times it size the day before. I live in Fayetteville NC, USA here are 4 views its black no hair has white on its back and a brownish red spot on each side of it. Thanks for any help. Stefanie
Reply: It is a mygalmorph of some sort?

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Reply: That looks like a wolf spider I am keeping now. I'm not totally sure
of its identity, but it bears a resemblance to Arctosa cinerea. In any case  it is not dangerous. Nathan Hepworth

1 October, 2004:
Hey, I found this spider in my house in San Jose, California and I was hoping you could identify it for me, and tell me whether it is
dangerous or not.
 

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Reply: That looks like it could be Dysdera crocata,  the woodlouse hunter. Check out these links: Click here or here. Nathan Hepworth

1 October, 2004:
We found this spider at our work on Martha's Vineyard Island,  Massachusetts. Please help us identify it! Thanks. Kelley Debettencourt

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Reply: Glen, his spider sure looks the same, i contacted akin by email & sent him the sight I sent you on the Carolina wolf spider, he said they look identical.... here are 3 pictures of my Carolina wolf spider.
thanks so much for the reply..... Martel Burrows

30 September, 2004:
Hi, I found this spider next to my office door couple of days ago. My office is in the deserts of Kazakhstan... It does not produce any web, or I'm yet to see any. Is it dangerious? Any poison? I hope you can help me out with this one. Regards,
A. AKIN KÖKSAL, SGI QC Manager, Senimdi Kurylys LLP, Tengiz/Kazakhstan
E-Mail : akoksal@senimdi.com
Click for larger photos.

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Reply: I'm not completly sure, but it looks like a male trapdoor spider.  Can you get a closer picture, especially of the front end of the spider? Nathan Hepworth

28 September, 2004:
This spider visited me two nights in a row even after I had let him outside  the first night. Can you help me identify him? I have decided to keep him. I  house 2 tarantulas too. Thanks in advance! Jennifer
Clackamas, OR

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Reply: Same as below--a species of Tetragnatha. Nathan Hepworth

27 September, 2004:
Can you identify this spider that we have on our pier? There are about 3 or 4 of them on the pier. Thanks Linda

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Reply: That looks like a long-jawed orbweaver, so it's probably  a species of Tetragnatha. Try running a search on those names. Nathan Hepworth

27 September, 2004:
hi, I've look through your page, the website contains lots of information bout spiders, i was wondering can you please help me out? i looked at trillions pic of spiders before. and still I couldn't find the species of them (attached).. please? I'm doing this for my school project, the spiders were found beside the man made koi fish pond its quite small. i read through the books in our library and even I've search from the internet. but still i cant find
can u mail me back as soon? thanks.  thanks in return, i appreciate your help a lot. thanks
regards,  chris

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Reply: That is a brown widow ( Latrodectus geometricus ). It IS  venomous, so BE CAREFUL!! Check link for confirmation:
http://www.floridanature.org/species.asp?
species=Latrodectus_geometricus
Nathan Hepworth

25 September, 2004:
Here is a photo taken on the evening of September 24, 2004 (with  flash) of a "black widow" type spider while resting in her web at  night. Any idea what type she is? She's never out in the day, and is  always in the same spot.

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Reply: The spider on the left I believe is Scytodes thoracica, a  type of spitting spider. They actually catch their prey by spraying them  down with a sticky glue! I don't know what the spider on the right is. Nathan Hepworth

25 September, 2004:
Hi,  Can you identify this spider and it’s baby? Thanks, I like your site!!

 

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Reply: That looks like the daring jumping spider, Phidippus audax. Nathan Hepworth

25 September, 2004:
We live in Atlanta, Georgia and are wondering if you can identify this spider for us. Thanks for your help. Rod and Wendy

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Another Reply: BE CAREFUL! That could be a hobo spider!  Could you get a closer picture of your "black widows" please? I think they  may be another spider, not a widow. Be careful in the meantime though. Nathan Hepworth
25 September, 2004:
Hi found this spider outside my back door. It had a nest behind some of my kids' 'outside' toys. He's fast. We put it in a jar with some black widows and some others, about 14 spiders in all, and let them duke it out. This big guy won after a couple of days. He jumps at the glass where your hand is, when you pick up the jar. Could you please tell me what you think it is AND if it is dangerous? I have killed two in my house, just like this one, as well. Should I get my house fumigated or just MOVE?! I am very phobic of spiders and I have three little children, please help! I live in Puyallup, WA, USA.

Reply: Please be careful with this one, it could be a hobo spider. Check out www.hobo.org
 

 

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24 September, 2004:
Hey! We love your website. I've used it to look up a couple of spiders in our area, but we came across one that I haven't seen the likes of online yet. Not sure if it's a Fishing Spider or what.. but it was HUGE! at least the size of my palm with thick legs and a furry backside. You can sort of see the markings on it's forward body in this photo, most notable - a dark black dot right in the middle. It was a big surprise on our walk today! Very exciting! Thought you might like to add it to your collection. We're in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
Jen

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24 September, 2004:
Hello. This very large specimen (shown on a tarragon plant) is from Ottawa Ontario. The
photographer contacted us for ID -unfortunately, my specialty is birds (you know, the nasty spider predators!). Would you be able to help? Thank you,
Pierre Mineau, PhD.
Research Scientist & Head, Pesticide Section
National Wildlife Research Centre of the Canadian Wildlife Service
& Adjunct Research Professor,
Department of Biology, Carleton University
 

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Reply: Looks like some sort of orb weaver.

24 September, 2004:
Dear Glen,
Hello again, could you help identify this spider? My wife found it while looking for milk weed to feed our Monarch butterfly
collection. By the way my kids love your website!


 

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23 September, 2004:
Hi, I was browsing through your site and found a picture of a spider from Sept. 13 2003 that looks exactly like the one we have outside on our balcony. There was no reply to it and was wondering if anyone had figured it out. I live in NJ and it has stuck around through some nasty thunder storms. At one point there were 3 of them, all different webs, on the balcony, I was totally freaked out! Our neighbour has one that built a huge web and we live in a brick building with aluminum railings. I was watching the this guy secure his web and was very fast. Kinda fuzzy, light and dark brown colouring, stripes on his legs. Like I said before, looks exactly like the Sept. 13, 2003 pic. I've attached it.... any idea?
Ivy Jean

Reply: This looks like some sort of orb weaver.

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Reply: This either a goldenrod spider ( Misumenops vatia ) or another "flower spider", of either Misumenops or Misumena. It is not considered harmful to humans. Nathan Hepworth

22 September, 2004:
This spider is in my avocado tree. I live in the Rancho Bernardo area of San Diego county California. Is it a Goldenrod crab spider or some other type of Orb weaver? Is it poisonous or harmful to humans? Thanks, Jeff, 09-22-2004

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Reply: That is the beautiful silver Argiope, species  Argiope argentata. Despite its size, it is not harmful, is actually shy when
confronted by humans, and, allergies aside, has only a mild bite.
Nathan Hepworth

22 September, 2004:
Hi: I have this spider living in my bougainvillea.  Do you know what kind of spider it is??  I am assuming it is poisonous. Thanks, Amanda Gable, AlisoViejo, CA

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Reply: That is a harmless Araneus orbweaver. Nathan Hepworth

21 September, 2004: Hi,
I took a couple of photos of this spider outside of my window in the bathroom, and was wondering what kind of spider is it?  Thanks,
Chris Chang
Industrial Designer, Farm, 12 Silver Lake Road, Hollis, NH 03049

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Reply: John-- The one on the left looks like a Zygiella orbweaver, in which case it would be harmless. The one on the right looks like either a Cryphoeca or Cicurina funnelweaver, harmless again. If you can, see if you  can find the webs these spiders make. If these IDs are correct, the one on  the left should spin the classic pinwheel-shaped web off of the ground, and  the one on the right should make a mostly flat web with a funnel in leaf
litter and under stones, as their names indicate.
Nathan Hepworth

20 September, 2004:
I would like to know if you could identify these two spiders; my 6 yr old son is always catching them around the outside of our house. The smaller one seems to be a little more aggressive than the other. We live in Aviano, Italy, Thank you, John

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19 September, 2004:
Hi, We really like your website and have had a great time looking at the pictures. We tough you would like to se an Iclandic spider. The Icelandic spiders are wery small, this is the largest one. It is kalled "cross-spider" in Icelandic, I dont know the English word for it. The mesurements on the picture is in cm not inches so the spider is smaller than one inch, not very big at all. thank you for a great website. by by
Svana Rós 7 years old and Hilmar 6 years old.
Reykjavík

Iceland

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Reply: Yes it is. Nathan Hepworth

19 September, 2004:
Glen, is this a Green Lynx spider?
csmorgan12@charter.net




 

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Reply: I really don't think it's dangerous. I would judge it  to be Araneus diadematus, the cross or common European garden spider ( introduced here ). There is a dangerous spider that resembles the spider in  your picture, the brown widow. but they are an introduced tropical spider  found only in the warm southern states so far as I know, and they do not sport the white cross marking on the top of the abdomen as yours appears to. Widows do not build wheel-shaped webs either. I'm 95+% sure it's the cross spider, but mentioned the other just to be safe. The sure way to tell is of  course the hourglass on the underside, which indicates the widow spider. If you still have the spider, I'd check it, if not, don't worry, the chance of  a brown widow being that far north are very slim. Nathan Hepworth
17 September, 2004:
Found this outside our house - web from azalea bush to wood house shingles. He was tucked up under one of the shingles. Web was orb shaped but messy looking. Wondering if it is dangerous. Anyone able to help?
Nikki King, Massillon, OH
 

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Reply: Hobo spiders cannot be ACCURATELY identified from appearance alone, they so closely resemble other funnel weavers. However, taking your  location, and the pictures of confirmed hobos I've seen, I'd say there is a  very good chance that it IS the hobo. Be careful! This site has some photos: www.hobospider.org Nathan Hepworth
17 September, 2004:
Hi Glen!
Great Site. I found this spider in my basement, just wondering what it is. I live in the Interior British Columbia. I have a really bad feeling that it is a Hobo spider. Feel free to use the picture on your website!
dillman_l@hotmail.com

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17 September, 2004:
G'day! I found your website thismorning - well done, it's fascinating. I am a nightwalk guide in the Daintree Rainforest, Far North Queensland. I took this photo last night of a Brush-footed Funnelweb in the entrance to its burrow. This is one of three or four that we usually see and it is remarkable how fast they are growing.  I hope you may find it interesting.  On our nightwalk we usually find lots of huntsman spiders, lately some slender sac spiders, Golden Orb weavers (a different variety up here than in Brizzy), and occasionally even cool Net-casting spiders.
Take it easy,
Murray.

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17 September, 2004:
Hello, This spider was found in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. It accidentally wandered into our warehouse and was captured. When I recieved the spider it was already dead. Excellent specimen though. Thought you would like to use this photo.
Thanks,
Mike

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17 September, 2004:
I live in Phoenix Arizona and I found this spider behind a cabinet at  work. It is the size of a half dollar with legs. We are unsure of what species it is. Can you help?
Thanks,
Levi

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Another Reply: Hi! The spider from 16 September fotographed by Edward Cochran looks to me like a Tegenaria spec., too. But I wouln't go so far to say that it's a hobo (Tegenaria agrestis). There are about 5 Tegenaria-species looking nearly the same (we have them all here around in Germany...). You can't identify them just by a picture (but I see that it is also written in the pdf-file ;). So I would be careful, too! Felix

Reply: This is a reply to Edward Cochran who submitted a note on September 16, 2004. I had the same spider in my basement. I too, live in British Columbia. I sent my spider to Orkin in Burnaby and they identified him as a Hobo spider, and he's exactly the same as your spider. Apparently, their bites can be very harmful, so be careful with that one. Good Luck!!
NOTE: Click here for a detailed pdf file on how to tell if it's a hobo spider or not.
16 September, 2004:
Hello, I just found your page, and it is great. I found this little fellow in  my basement, and was wondering if you might know what type it is. I live  in northern British Columbia Canada. The body of the spider is about 3/4  inch long, It is about 2 1/2 inches across the legs. Any info you may  have would be great. Thank you in advance.
Regards
Edward Cochran

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16 September, 2004:
I found this spider in Lunenberg Nova Scotia. It was on an old wooden cross in an old cemetery. It was about the size of a quarter. I have been searching the web for a similar spider but have yet to find one. Any information? from smclark@eastlink.ca

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Reply: That is a spined Micrathena, species Micrathena  gracilis. A harmless oddity. Nathan Hepworth

15 September, 2004:
I live in Ohio.. Could you tell me what kind of spider this is?? thanks, Ami Todd

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Reply:  By all appearances, I would say those are Achaearanea  tepidariorum, the American house spider. They prey on widows, so that may be  why you found them near the black widow. Nathan Hepworth
15 September, 2004:
I have an infestation of what I thought were black widows. Found 1 all black with the red hour glass a few years ago. One like these were in the same web with the definite black widow. I assumed it to be a juvenile.  Since then the rest look more like these. Is it a brown widow? Black widow juvenile? or orb? There are hundreds around my house and shed. There just doesn't seem to be the hour glass on the bellies of these.

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14 September, 2004:
Hi...Your site has my nerves crawling! But very interesting. Here is a spider I couldn't find on your site, but have found many in my home over the past month. I live in North West Alabama and was wondering if you know what it is! I think one of two things are going on, 1 either they are starting to migrate into the house due to cooler weather or 2 I have an infestation problem. I have caught this specimen for the local pest control. If you might know what it is could you post it ? I was told it's a brown recluse but doesn't look anything like the pictures I see here.
Thanks!

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Reply: This looks like some sort of spiny Micrathena.

14 September, 2004:
My son pointed this spider out to me today. I haven't seen this before. Can you tell me what it is?? Thanks!

Ilona

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Reply: It certainly looks like a Venusta Orchard Spider.

14 September, 2004:
Southern Illinois, USA. Discovered this lovely spider at work on my deck. Your site is fabulous!

 

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Reply: Looks like a camel spider, (other names -  wind scorpion, sun spider.)

13 September, 2004:
Glen, Do you have any idea what this is and whether it is dangerous? My wife found it inside our new house in Rocklin California. It is agressive and fast. Ugly and scary too! I have two toddlers, the 3 year old loves
to hunt for spiders. I'm concerned. Thanks
Mel Jones
Rocklin California

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Reply: Could be a fishing spider.

13 September, 2004:
Unidentified Spider - I found the biggest Spider I have ever seen away from a museum! Salisbury, NC. Very similar to:" 22 August, 2004 Found near Augusta, Georgia. What is it? Do you know?  Thanks for your help.
Dig

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Reply: That is a funnelweaver, probably a species of Agelenopsis,  which are harmless. The only other possibility is that of a Tegenaria  funnelweaver, which are all harmless except one species--the hobo spider.  But, given the fact that the nearest known population of hobo's is well over  a thousand miles away from you, I don't think you have to worry about it  being that one....:) Nathan Hepworth

13 September, 2004:
Hi, I live in the mountains of western North Carolina and have seen this spider in southeastern Pennsylvania as well. The web is definitely funnel shaped and the spider is close to 2 inches long. This is the first
time I have seen an egg sac - this one appears to be mixing in some cut grass, I assume as camouflage. Our question is, what species is this and is it poisonous? Should we get rid of the egg sac? We have a few webs around the back deck, but have only seen the one spider. Thanks,
Matt

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Reply: Tracy-- BE CAREFUL!!!!! That is a certainly a mygalomorph spider, possibly one of the funnelwebs related to the Sydney funnelweb! I will refer  this image to an Australian fellow I'm acquanted with, who knows your native  spiders much better than I do. Please operate under the assumption that it  has a VERY serious bite.  Nathan Hepworth


12 September, 2004:
Hi Glen,
i just found two of these spiders in my garden, can you tell me what it is, and if you know of a place in Adelaide, that will take them from me...

Tracy

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Reply: It is a spiny micrathena - Araneidae Micrathena sagittata, one of the orb weaving family.

12 September, 2004:
My mother found this spider out in her yard. In Clermont, FL. We was wondering what kind of spider it was, and if at all it was danderous. If you could please contact me and let us know what kind of spider it is and if it is harmfull. Thank you,
Heather

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Reply: That is a wolf spider, possibly the hefty species Hogna  Helluo. Nathan Hepworth

11 September, 2004:
My names is Arthur Grupp and i'm a custodian at the Tuftonboro Central School in Tuftonboro NH. We have some roof work being done on the school and we discovered a few of these spiders in and outside of the school soon after the work started. i suspect they may have come here with the shingles and plywood we're using. i went on line and found your site. Any ideas as to what family these spiders belong to? The students looked in some books and the closest thing was a Funnel Spider but the abdomen of ours is not shiny and has hair and patterns on it. Thanks for any input you can give us. Arthur Grupp

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11 September, 2004:
Hi In simple terms.. what is this hahahah!
People seem to say Recluse right away but i disagree. The markings are way  off... Your "web"site is a tremendous help, thanks. It was found last night in Las Vegas,NV, USA on my front door step, next to my bare foot!! AAAAH!! The exact knife blade is for some
scale...and..uh..my defense haha

Click here for full size pic.

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11 September, 2004:
Hello. A few days ago I found this spider in my bath tub. I have spent every extra second searching the internet trying to identify it. I found a few possibilities but none of them seem to have the distinct markings like the ones on its underside. I am VERY terrified of spiders and this big guy has really scared me. I have children in the house and even though he is gone I am afraid momma, daddy, or babies might be in here. We have always had spiders in here because we live right outside the woods but never anything in the house this big. He was 3 1/2 inches from tip to tip. Any information you could give me would be greatly appreciated and it would help me sleep knowing it wasn't poisonous. It's not dangerous right? Thanks, Techa Southwest Mississippi. Please feel free to use these photos anyway you want.

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11 September, 2004:
Hello I live in the South-West coast of Western Australia and this spider found a
suitable living environment in my rain gauge for quite some time. Never made  any webs and was generally pretty calm. Could move pretty fast when it wanted  to though. Originally thought it was just a small harmless huntsman so I  decided to take a photo of it but when I saw it's eyes I wasn't too sure. To be perfectly honest I don't know a great deal about spiders... :) anyway got
one good shot and then decided to take another just to make sure when all of a
sudden my friend took a reasonable size leap onto the camera. To my knowledge
huntsmans can't jump! Could this perhaps be a wolf spider? May not be the best
photo for identification purposes!
Thanks
Jason

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Reply: These both look like a nursery web spider.

10 September, 2004:
Hello again, Glenda, Thanks for posting my argiope pics on your wonderful site. I found a couple of close ups which you might find interesting. One is a type of jumping spider, the other I think is a nursery web spider. Best wishes, Sue. Click for a larger view.

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7 September, 2004
Hi Glen,
Spiders absolutely make my flesh crawl, but your website is very interesting, and has some brilliant photos. I found a spider this morning when I was shifting a bed, and it scared the crap out of me. I wasn't sure what it was, but after consulting a few books think maybe it's a Pholcid, but if it is, it's certainly the biggest one i've seen, it was around 3 1/2 inches long, with a body of around 1.5 cm. It's legs were fine, but not as spindly as most other daddy long legs I've seen either. Its abdomen was a mottled cream and white, and the head had a spot and stripe from the centre towards the abdomen. If you could tell me what this spider is for sure, it'd be most appreciated
Thanks, Amanda.
 

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7 September, 2004
Hey Glen my name is Dave a couple of weeks ago while camping in Michigan I woke up in the morning and found this spider species with its web attached to my tent. I have included one picture with this email but I took about 6 or 7 more pictures. The picture I sent is the top side of the spider. The bottom side of the spider is even more colorful. Let me know if you want to see them. Do you have any idea what kind of spider this is? I have never seen a body shape and or color combinations like this before. Hey maybe its a freak of nature the campgrounds is located next to a nuclear plant !!!
Dave

Reply: It is a spiny micrathena - Araneidae Micrathena sagittata, one of the orb weaving family.

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Reply: That is an immature spider, probably a type of cobweb weaver such as Steatoda or Achaearanea. Nathan Hepworth

6 September, 2004
Hi, Found this baby spider in our garage and need your help in identifying this spider for us. It has a large round body with brown and white spots pattern. It is about a quarter of an inch (must be a baby). Picture enclosed.
Pls. help. Thanks.

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3 September, 2004
Hello,
I was travelling in Thailand a couple of months ago and while visiting a temple in the mountains of Chiang Mai, I came across this amazing spider! Its abdomen was about the size of a Canadian loonie, and about a 1/2 inch thick. I have searched the internet, but I can't seem to find anything similar! If you could help me out I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!
Stephanie, Canada.

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Reply: I believe that is Dolomedes tenebrosus, a relative of the spider below. Nathan Hepworth

2 September, 2004
Hello,  I keep finding this spider on my beach in Northern Ontario Canada, I originally thought it to be a Dock Spider (AKA Fish Spider) but I am not sure anymore, do you have any suggestions as to what it could be?
Thanks Jamie Shedden

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Reply: That looks like Dolomedes scriptus, a type of fishing spider ( not necessarily found around water ). Nathan Hepworth

2 September, 2004
Dear Glen, Hi, we recently moved to a new house in South Eastern Pennsylvania and found two of these spiders in our garage. They were on a broom handle and roughly 3 to 4 inches long. Being arachnaphobic, I am trying to get over my fears by learning about spiders and force myself to look at your website. (Even though I usually beak into hives!) We found these spiders after a heavy rain in August, 2004.
Thanks so much,
Heather

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1 September, 2004
My son spotted this interesting spider while we were walking through a wooded area. I must admit that I had never seen a spider quite like this one. We called him a "crab" spider for a long time because the name sounded appropriate at the time, but now, after much searching on the Internet, I believe this an Orb Weaver which can be identified by family/genus/species as a Araneidae Micrathena sagittata. I'm certainly not a spider expert so my identification could be incorrect. This frightful looking fellow looks as though he could defend his own turf without any problem.
Dale Parsons
The spider and I reside in Tulsa Oklahoma USA



Click for a larger view.

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1 September, 2004
After looking at zillions of spider photos on the Internet, I suspect that my water spider is a Dolomedes triton or at least related to that family. I find him among the lily pads on our fish pond. He tends to keep 3 - 4 legs on the pad and 3 - 4 legs in the water. A beautiful spider. I've not seen him/her catch anything yet though. In the photo, four of the eight legs seem to be resting on water surface tension, one leg is under the water, and the other three grasping the lily pad.
I live in Tulsa Oklahoma, USA.
Dale Parsons



Click for a larger view.

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Reply: It looks like a Venusta Orchard Spider.

29 August
, 2004
Hello. My husband found this one day at work crawling out of some vents. I believe it is a small garden spider but I am unsure. I have never seen one with such emerald green legs before and a disporportionate body. Can you help me identify this little guy? Thanks in advance.
Christy from Missouri

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Another Reply: This one looks like a funnel weaver spider (Agelenopis species) . Click here for  picture to compare.
29 August
, 2004
Hi, I found this spider in my garage. It nested in a window. Could you possibly identify it. There are 5 funnel webs in my garage. I have attached 3 pics ( 1 of the spider, 2 of the web) I live in Oshawa Ontario, Canada. Regards, Dan

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Reply: Hi! First of all: your side is awesome!  This spider  is like the one from 17 August, a Araneus diadematus, but here it's a male. You can clearly see the white cross on its back. They're really common here in Germany. Felix Hug
Another Reply: The photo in question is a male Araneus Diadematus or common garden spider. It is harmless. This time of the year the mature males stop making a web and
instead are out looking for females to mate with. Dan, Bothell Wa

27 August, 2004
Hi, I found this spider crawling across my deck in the back yard today. He is about 2 cm and looks like the photos of Hobo spiders I have found on the net. I live in San Mateo, California which doesn’t seem to be the Hobos range. Any ideas of what he is? If he is a Hobo I will kill him. If he is not he shall be set free.
Thanks,
Bill

23 August, 2004

Hi Glen. I love the site. Great info and pics. This morning, my mother and I were walking in the woods near our home and we came across this funnel-shaped web. It was located about 3 feet off the ground attached to a tree. I have been doing research all day about trapdoor spiders and funnel web spiders but neither criteria fits this spider. There was no "trap door" covering the entrance to the funnel but yet the spider didn't look like the funnel webs that I have seen. It is probably a sub-species but I am very curious. The forest rangers here in eastern TN have said that there are no funnel webs here but I'm not quite so sure. The spider that they called a trapdoor spider resembled the funnel web more than the trapdoor spiders, attitude and all. Anyways, attached is a picture of the web and the spider lying in wait of it's dinner. Feel free to post it if you'd like. P.S. It's not a totally clear pic of the spider but it's all the spider would allow me to get.
Sincerely,
Heather Ayers
Chattanooga, TN, USA

Click for a larger view to see the spider.

Reply: The forest rangers probably were thinking of the  infamous Sydney funnelwebs, which are not native to north america. The spiders we have here which build that type of web are called funnel "weavers", so that may have been the point of confusion. It is definitely a  funnel weaver, probably a species of Tegenaria.  - Nathan Hepworth

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Reply:  Jean - First off, it's not dangerous. What you have is probably  a sheet-web spider known as a hammock spider, a species of Pityohyphantes.  - Nathan Hepworth

22 August
, 2004

I live in Virginia, USA. My screened-in porch has been taken over by these spiders (see attached photo). I have small children, so I was concerned that it may be poisonous. What kind of spider is it and is it poisonous? Thank you, Jean Lucas

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22 August, 2004

Found near Augusta, Georgia. What is it? Do you know?

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Reply: The spider pictured on August 22nd in Mexico is part of the Nephila species.
-Justin Schuch

22 August, 2004

Hi I found your web site while searching to identify a spider, what a cool site!!! A couple of weeks ago I was down in Monterrey Mexico, while walking near a water fall, I saw a spider that I was totally unfamiliar with and was hoping someone out there may have seen it before, attached is the picture, thanks.
John

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21 August, 2004

Hi
Our neighbour recently found this spider hiding in some leaves on the roof of her chook shed. Could u help us to identify it. We live in Darwin, Northern Territory. Its abdomen was about the size of a ten cent piece and had tinges of yellow on the front top of the abdomen.
Thanks
Steve

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Reply: Chris - From that picture I would guess it to be a male Dolomedes triton, the six-spotted fishing spider. Pic to compare with:
http://www.giffbeaton.com/2004-04-24_
PLWMA_Dtriton.jpg
- Nathan Hepworth

19 August
, 2004

here is a spider I found outside of my house in tallahassee, fl and I'm not sure what type it is but it scared the hell out of my girlfriend.
chris

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Reply: That is DEFINITELY a brown widow, a close relative of the black widow. Although not quite as venomous as a black widow, they  ARE dangerous, so be very careful!! These are an introduced species in the  USA, and have been spreading across the subtropical US since they were introduced in Florida. To the untrained eye, they look very much like the harmless american house spider, but there is one tell-tale sign ( beside the hourglass marking on the belly ) that helps distinguish them: their egg sacs are covered in little tufts of silk, whereas the house spider's sac is  smooth, almost papery. Here are some webpages to consult on brown widows:
http://www.floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Latrodectus_geometricus
http://www.hobospider.org/widows.html
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us/pi/enpp/ento/venomousspiders.htm
 - Nathan Hepworth

18 August, 2004

Hello, I live in Southern California, just west of the Palm Springs area.  I am trying to identify a spider.  I have included a few pictures I took today.  Can you tell me what kind of spider is "spider A"?  It was about 1.5 inches with it's legs spread out (top to bottom).  It was with "spider B".  I found them both under one of those white plastic outdoor chairs.  At one point spider A seemed to attack spider B, but then later checked to see if it was still there. Thank You so much

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Reply:
Gerri - That is a silver Argiope, species Argiope argentata. Beautiful spider you found!! - Nathan Hepworth

18 August
, 2004
What a great website, creepy but great! I know you said you don't  identify spiders but if anyone could give me any info on this spider  that lives in my dad's condo porch in South Padre Island Tx.Thanks!
gerri

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Reply: Those are harmless orbweaving spiders. I can't tell  for sure, but the one to the left looks like Araneus trifolium, the shamrock  spider, and the second either another Araneus, or possibly a Neoscona. Nathan Hepworth

17 August
, 2004
sorry... i accidentally pushed the wrong button before i attached the photos.
also, the last picture is one that resembles a different spider that i saw crawling across my garage floor..
 

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Reply: That looks like Araneus diadematus, the cross  or common European garden spider. It is a harmless orbweaving spider that  has been introduced from Europe to the US.
Nathan Hepworth

17 August, 2004
Hello,
This is a first for us, as we have now seen quite a few of this spider in our backyard (Boston, Massachusetts). I am including two photos of the same spider and I hope they come through. Aside from this large one, there are several other webs with small sized spiders of the same type. We haven't a clue as to what it is and are hopeful that you could shed some light on it for us. I found you on my google search.
Thank you in advance,
Andie Kurzman

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Reply: That looks like Thanatus formicinus, a type of  Philodromid crab spider. See the pic on this page: http://www.xs4all.nl/~ednieuw/Spiders/thumbnails/spidhome_thumbnails.htm
You'll scroll more than halfway down the page, and it's under the header  "Philodromidae, crab spiders" - Nathan Hepworth

17 August, 2004
I love your site!

Here's a pic of an interesting little spider (1/4" wing-span) from Arizona.
It's living in a crack in a night blooming cactus stem.

 

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Reply: That is Araneus trifolium, the shamrock spider, a harmless  species of orbweaving spider. - Nathan Hepworth

15 August, 2004
We found this spider in Hanover, Pennsylvania (five miles from the Maryland line) and it looks identical to the one found in Manitoba, Canada yesterday. It does weave a web with very strong silk (it was hard to pull him away from the grill cover that she made her home! It also looks like she laid a little egg sac or something on the cover. This fluff of silk is about half the size of a dime. Any ideas about what type of spider this is?

..

Reply: Same as above, Araneus trifolium (shamrock spider ). - Nathan Hepworth

13 August
, 2004
I spent a couple hours going over your site (good stuff) and could not find anything on this spider. I don't know what kind of web it has because my wife collected it off a flower. We live near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (3.5 hours north of Fargo, ND) Any idea?

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Reply: The spider that John has asked about, providing an excellent picture, is none other than a tail-less whip scorpion. They do not have spinnerets like a regular spider, and they catch their prey with their pinchers (similar to a praying mantis). Have no clue about whether or not they are venomous, but so far know that they are non-aggressive to humans.

13 August, 2004
Do you have any idea what this is? With
legspan it was about 3" across.

I took the pic on my patio in Tucson, Arizona
last night.

Thanks,
John

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Another Reply: Actually.... They are arachnids, but they aren't spiders. The technical name for them is "Solifugid", but they go by  "sunspider" or "windscorpion" ( the front two appendages aren't technically "legs", but "pedipalps", and are used for catching prey, not for locomotion. ) It is likely either stuffed or pregnant, like he said. These are not  dangerous, as they don't have venom, but they can give quite the bite with those jaws. Nathan Hepworth

Reply:  This spider is in the same family as the camel spider, but a bit smaller in size. Judging from my personal experience with Camel Spiders in Iraq, the ten legged creature in this picture is obviously a female (bolder in size), and had either eaten a big meal, or is pregnant (one of the two). They are not exactly in the family of arachnids, because they have ten legs, the front two used to assist in climbing slippery surfaces. They can go where a regular spider cannot.
13 August, 2004
Ok, I skimmed through your great spider site and didn’t see this spider. We found it at the end of our garage in Las Vegas, Nevada and we were wondering what kind of spider this may be. Of if it is a spider at all. Thanks! Cheers
Kurt

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Reply: Julie and Bertrand - Well, I'm not sure just what was going on,  but they were not making babies. They are of totally different species. The smaller is not a "true spider", but a "mygalomorph", the group of spiders  that includes the trapdoor spiders and tarantulas. Yours is most likely a  trapdoor spider. The larger one is a true spider, possibly a Tegenaria, or house spider. All I can guess is the larger attacked and killed the smaller spider, and maybe got bitten by it in the process. - Nathan Hepworth

12 August
, 2004
Hello Here are a couple of pictures of a spider found in a parisian garden. We have a
doubt on the type of the spider, not only considering it was 1,8 inchs, but also because it had been bitten or vampirized by another spider, three times smaller... As you might notice on the picture the huge spider was covered of a white glue, stuck to its back. The smallest never moved, seemed dead whereas the biggest moved when we shooked it. Could you confirm us not only its type but also pick up between the three
solutions below:
- they were making babies
- the small one died trying to kill the bigest
- the smallest was a clone of the biggest,
like twins would be (one being sick and uncompletely grown) Thanks for your help, Great website ;)))
Julie & Bertrand from Paris

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Reply: Nathan and Vanessa - That is a wolf spider for sure, probably  from the genus Hogna. - Nathan Hepworth
12 August, 2004
I found this spider in Amherstburg, Ontario Canada. The picture shows it standing next to a quarter (canadian coin). The spider is around 3 inches. I have never seen anything this big around here before. Can you please tell me what this is.

nathanandvanessa2002@hotmail.com

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Reply: That looks like a Dolomedes tenebrosus, a type of  fishing spider. Despite their name, "Fishing spiders" are not always found  near water - Nathan Hepworth

9 August
, 2004
I ran into this spider next to the garbage can, was wondering if you knew what it was?
Thanks,
Jason

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7 August, 2004
Found on my bathroom floor....any idea what it is?

I THINK THIS MIGHT BE IT

Callobius severus

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31 July, 2004
I found this spider in my front yard. My fear got the best of me, so I killed it. After, though, I noticed it had a flourecent green abdomen. I tried to identify it online that night, but I couldn't find it. The closest I got was the Yellow Orb Weaver. I don't have a digital camara, so please excuse the bad quality. Can you help me.
Asriel Gonzalez
asrielgonzalez@hotmail.com
 

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Reply: This looks like a woodlouse spider. Here's a link to a page on them:
http://spiders.entomology.wisc.edu/Dysderidae/Dysdera/crocata.html
29 July, 2004
I live on southern Vancouver Island, and these spiders are very common around my house, and I was wondering if you knew what they are. They generally live under things like rotting logs, or flower pots, but have been known to come inside. They can climb up and down smooth surfaces and they run very fast. They sometimes burrow in sand or dirt as well. Here are some pictures I took this morning; it was rather easy to find a spider. The spider is about 5 or 6 cm long, legs included.

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Reply: I would be very, very careful with that one. I can't  tell for sure from the photo ( another shot, not so shady would help), but it LOOKS like a Phoneutria fera or nigriventor, which is VERY dangerous. It's venom is extremely strong, and they are ridiculouslyaggressive. Do NOT get near it!!!!! Here is a page to look at ( with a picture ):
http://www.petbugs.com/caresheets/P-fera.html This spider is native to Brazil and its neighboring countries, but the appearance definitely matches your spider. Where are you located? - Nathan Hepworth

26 July, 2004
I have a spider on the house and I've never seen this type before. I am sending a picture or two of it, and would like to know if I should do anything about it. It is very large with grey blackish skin. The texture almost resembles a lizards skin. Please send a response to this e-mail. Just me, Hal J. King

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23 July, 2004
The other day, I came across what turned out to be a fairly good sized spider nest in one of my bushes. There on top of the nest was a spider which I was able to take a picture of. I have never encounter a spider of this size, or type before in New Hampshire. I am very interested in knowing what kind of spider it was. Any help you could give me would be greatly appreciated.
Regards,
Jeffrey Drew

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20 July, 2004
Hello. I live in eastern North Carolina about 30 miles from the coast. I discovered these webs in my back yard and was wondering what type of spider lived in them. It appears to be some type of funnel web, but I don't think that those types of spiders live in this area. We had put some crickets from the yard into the webs trying to get photos, but the spiders proved to be too fast for our digital camera. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Our dog wonders around back there. Thanks, Jason

 

 

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18 July, 2004:
I'm sorry now I didn't take the time to take more photos of this spider which I found on an orb shaped web suspended in the doorway of a tool shed. I'd noticed the web earlier but then later walked through it in a hurry to find a tool I needed. The spider ended up on
my arm and when I brushed it away I noticed it was unusual. I found it crawling on the floor and at that time it's back looked very much like the photo's Arya A. Sadhana took and that are posted on your site. It reminded me of a large fly when looking at the back.
I live in central West Virginia in the US. I left it suspended on a web strand hanging from the bail of a small bucket where it had
crawled and appeared to have settled in for the afternoon. Tonight it is gone and I hope to find it in a web somewhere on my back porch in the morning.  I'd love to know what the heck this spider is called.
Wes Jones

 

Reply: It looks like a spiny micrathena.

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Reply: I really enjoyed looking at your website. There is an entry for july 14 2004 from someone in arizona. It looks like a tailess whipscorpion. I think part of there latin name is Amblypygid. I used to raise them with an old boyfriend.

14 July, 2004:
Hi, I live in Phoenix Arizona (USA), and found (see picture) a spider in our garage. The body was about 2 cm and in total 7 cm. Do you know what kind of spider this is?
Thanks,
Remko

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Reply: The photos of a spider and toad caught in a web are of a female brown widow
(Latrodectus geometricus) and a very young southern toad (Bufo terrestris). Josh Hillman

14 July, 2004:
Hi Glen,

Took these this morning on my front porch in Lakeland, FL US. Looks like a brown widow to me, but I failed to get a pic of it's undercarriage. Here's hoping that you can identify. Enjoy!

All the best,
Tim Stradling

 

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Reply: Your website is pretty amazing. I was looking at the many unidentified spider you have pictured and noticed that one looked very familiar to me. It was submitted 13 July 2004. This looks just like what we have around here in eastern Idaho. They are very common (if it is the same one). We call them cat-faces. I'm not sure what the real name is for them, unless cat-faced is the real name. I did a search on the internet under cat face spiders and found an good picture and site of what is called the Cat-Faced spider (source is Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Entomology).
Here is the link to that site and the photo of the Cat-Faced spider (Araneus gemma) :
http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/Pests/catspid.htm
http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/images/catFace6.jpg
Let me know if this helps. To me it looks extremely similar. The "star" pattern looks a bit more distinct on your site's photo, but the general patterns both look very similar in your picture and the Colorado State one above.
Enoch Heileson

Idaho Falls, ID

13 July, 2004:
Thanks for the Reply. Sorry about the first photo, maybe this one works?

I just thought this thing was fairly unusual (at least I have never  seen anything like it around here)

Note the well defined "Star" with the arrow pointing forward (above the  star)

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13 July, 2004:
Sorry the pictures are blurry, when I tried to get a close-up the spider spit gobs of white fluid out of its backside that arced about two inches in the air, so I left it alone. The scary part is that I'm in Nova Scotia, Canada, and we don't have all that many "large" spiders here...it's supposed to be too cold, I think. We also saw four or five egg sacks the size of golf balls full of greenish thingies. The spider is sitting on a "two-by-six" piece of lumber, and it was one of several around the yard of a house my sister is thinking of buying. I also took a picture of a hole in the floor of the kitchen that I was too chicken to look into, so I just pointed and clicked, and when I saw it on the computer, there's the silhouette of another spider. Are these garden variety spiders, or did someone bring back something from vacation that they shouldn't have?
Thanks,
Barb Burns
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

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10 July, 2004:
I live in the Texas Hill Country. (Rocky ground, dryish climate) This spider is at the top of the outside brick by the porch ceiling, above a door. The brick is 2 3/4" wide. I've looked all over the web to identify it. The closest I've come is the Nursery Web Spider, the Huntsman, and the Wolf Spider. But the eyes seem different than any of those (from the pictures I saw) What might it be? (Picture taken July 2004)
Brenn Colson

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8 July, 2004:
hi
I live in southern Maryland and this spider has taken up residence in my basement. it's body is at least 1in long. if you know what it is, please tell me. thanks!

Emily

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Reply: This is a female spinybacked orbweaver (Gasteracantha cancriformis). The  yellow coloring is common in species from Texas; Florida species have white
instead.  Josh Hillman

6 July, 2004:
Hello,
I live in Taylor Texas which is in Central Texas 30 miles northeast of Austin. I found this small spider about 5mm, that spun a web between my boat and fence. I am 42 and have lived in central Texas all of my life and have never seen one before. Can you identify it for me thanks.
Dario Connors
Taylor,

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6 July, 2004:
not sure what it is, not sure it's a spider even. it was the funniest  little guy, reminded me of Pigpen in the peanuts cartoon. He left a little trail of dirt or dust behind him. i found him on our kitchen floor in Massachusetts. he was less than .5 mm in length hope someone can shed some light on what it is!
thanks, george

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6 July, 2004:
This is a picture of a huge spider that I think is a funnel web or hololena. I have seen dozens here on my farm in the Blue Ridge Mts. of Virginia, but this one was between 2 & 3 inches long!!


visit the New River Valley's homeless animals online at www.nrvanimalshelters.com

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2 July, 2004:
I LOVE your site!! What a great educational tool! I live in Chattanooga, Tennessee which is located in South Eastern, US. I know that your expertise is mostly about Australian spiders but I thought I would give you guys a try and see if you could help me identify this spider. I found him unfortunately drowned in a cup my little son had left in our garden which had been grown over by weeds. It was quite startling on discovery, but now I can't stop wondering about who this guy is. I assume he was living in the cup which tells me that it did not live in a web. That is about all I know. Any suggestions or advice will be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for such a great resource
Cheers, Stacie Jackson

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Reply:  Hello again, this spider pictured with the date of 2 July is also a bold/daring jumping spider.

2 July, 2004:
Hello:
My name is Anita. My 10 year old son, Brandon and I wanted to contribute to your website. We took this picture today in our backyard garden. We do not know what it is and I teach him not to touch, trap and/or play with anything he cannot positively identify so we made no attempts to catch it for closer photos to take measurement and any other more descriptive information. I hope the photo is provide enough info for photos.

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Click here for the first part of 2004.
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