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Spider Photos 2005 (3)

Here's Page 3 of some unidentified spider photos sent in by viewers from 2005. Please choose a section below.

Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    

UNIDENTIFIED SPIDERS 2005 (3)

Reply: Looks similar to the steatoda nobilis on this page
29 Dec
ember, 2005:
I live outside Portland, Or. and found this spider in a shed in our back yard it is 3/8 of an inch across (including legs) it doesn't have a hourglass marking, and does not seem to be aggressive at all. I have looked at various sites on the net but have not found much that is very close in appearance. I would greatly appreciate any help you can give me in identifying this  spider. (There is actually at least 4 out there, and it is also December so this may explain it's small size.)   Thank You,  Mike J

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Verification from Victorian Museum:
You are correct, what you have is indeed a Black House spider ( Badumna insignis ). The dead give away that it was not a funnel web is the position of the fangs. Funnel webs have their fangs pointing forward almost like two stubby arms sticking out from the front of their head while in this one the fangs are pointing downwards towards the ground. The markings clearly seen on the abdomen are classic for this spider as well.
Peter Lillywhite
Senior Collection Manager
Entomology & Arachnology
Museum Victoria

Reply: From the later photos I would say this is the black house spider Badumna Insignis, which is described as having a row of  faint white V's on their back. The head -(Thorax) is shiny black and the eyes are in two rows of four. The Black House spider comes from the family Pesidae, it is a species of lace web-making spider.

28 December, 2005:
Hi Glen,  I was wondering if you could assist me with the identification of the spider in the attached photo. I took this image earlier today at the entrance to my garage (I live in Turramurra, Sydney). I killed this spider along with about six of its friends (all living in and around my garage door, and I normally would not kill them except we have a two year old and my wife insisted). I suspect this is a female Sydney funnel web spider (based on comparison with other photos and charts) and also because of the apparent egg sack it is clinging to. Not in the photo is a loose funnel like web (rather thin) that I cleared out of the way to make for a better image. I am fairly certain of the identification and I would not otherwise trouble you except I am not exactly sure what it is because of the markings on its back, and if it is a funnel web we need to take better precautions with our daughter (as there is sure to be more). Thanks in advance for any help in identification you can give.
Cheers,
Dan Baldry

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Reply: Could be a bird dropping spider.

12 December, 2005:
can u tell me what type of spider it is your site is awesome john


 

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Reply: Looks like some sort of spined micarathena - glen

5 December, 2005:
i found this spider on one of our hikes up the rio negro in brazil. i have asked all over trying to find out what it is please get back to us on what it is so i can find more info on this cool spider. it is aprox 1 inch long.
thanks for your time james s, alberta canada
 

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5 December, 2005:
Hi Glen, can you tell what this is?
thanks,
Julie
Northern California
 

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29 November, 2005:
Hi there. Iím from South Africa and my mother is a Grade 0 school teacher. Sheís found this spider in the garden and itís become the classís ďschool petĒ. Itís easy to feed as it eats the insects you give it, but now itís had babies and we have no idea what to feed them. Any idea what spider it is and what to feed the babies?
Kind regards
Ingrid Pretorius
 

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Reply: The one on the left is most likely one of the golden silk orb weaver family and the one on the right from the garden orb weaver family.

. 26 November, 2005:
hi, I am Vyankatesh Mujumdar From India, I am sending 2 photos of spider witch I found in Melghat Tiger Reserve (Maharashtra,India). I like u r web site it is very good can u tell me how can i get the information about spiders in India. I want to reseach on them How can I do that? Please help me . the Information about spiders which i send to u is..
1)Giant wood Spider. widly found in deep forest useawly in Winter.
2)I dont no.

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Reply: I think it looks like a wooodlouse hunter too. Could be a male.

26 November, 2005:
I found this one in my dogs water dish, and appears to be belly up, I was  told it could be a woodlouse spider, but I would think the bottom would be a lot  bigger, I live in Northeast Ohio, any suggestions?
 

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Reply: Looks like a member of the nephila species which the Golden Silk Orb Weavers also belong to - glen.
22 November, 2005:
I found your website whilst trying to identify this specimen that I found in Northeastern Nigeria. They are very common there, it is not unusual to find a whole tree covered in their webs with several adults living there. Locals say that they are poisonous but this might just mean that they give a nasty bite - I didn't try! I guess the one in the picture I have attached was about 10-12cm in length. I saw some with slightly different colours but they looked the same otherwise. The webs are very strong and span considerable distances. Thanks for any info. you can give. Matt.

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 November, 2005:
Hi, I found your website, because we saw a very big spider at our property in Oroville, CA this weekend. I wanted to find out what kind it is and if it can be dangerous to us or our dogs.
Attached is the photo, it was about 2 inches in body size, seemed very big to us. We saw it in the field and it seems to live in holes in the ground. I would appretiate any info. Thank you,
Eva Dehelean

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Reply: It looks like a huntsman.

14
November, 2005:
Hi, I found this spider dead (thank god), in the bottom of my swimming pool. I have exausted my searching of the internet, and was wondering if you could help me in my quest to identify it. It has an outstretched legspan of 4" and BLOODY HUGE fangs. Location: Newcastle, NSW AUstralia.
Thanks heaps :) Lox and Helen.

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14 November, 2005:
Hi there
I just visited your website which is very interesting.  Anyway, I took a picture of a spider in our garden, but I've never seen one like it. Here is the photo, could you perhaps tell me what it is and where I can get more information on it? I'm from central South Africa.
Kind regards
Rudi

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12 November, 2005:
My boys and I were trying to identify this beauty of a spider I found when removing some dusty books from the corner bookshelf. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks,
Analicia, Nicolas and Oscar

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Reply: The closest match I could suggest is the yellow sac spider. Check this page to compare.
12
November, 2005:
Dear Glen, I have a little bit of a strange situation. It is going to sound like a joke, but I promise it is not. I am in the Philippines and I have a small baby monkey that was bitten by a spider. He was trying to catch it to eat it and apparently the spider was not willing to go without a fight. It definitely bit the monkey because the monkey rubbed his hand for several minutes after the bite. I need your help in identifying the spider to know if there is anything I can do or should do to minimize the effects of any venom that might be involved. I really appreciate your help. Thank you, Robert Ross

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Reply: Don't worry, that is a male Kukulcania hibernalis, also called the "southern house spider." It is NOT a recluse, and is actually quite harmless. Go here and here for info and pics:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN301
http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1225163 - Nathan Hepworth

10 November, 2005:
hello, my wife is a complete scardey cat when it comes to any size or type of spider. today she
left a glass of water at our bedside, and she went back to go get the water several hours later and found a huge spider in it. she wanted me to kill it, but I wanted to find out if it was a
brown recluse or not, because we're having a baby in a month and we don't want spiders crawling all over him that are dangerous. when i saw the spider I was freaked out by how big it was. hopefully you can tell from these pictures if it is a recluse or not. (my camera sucks and tries to focus what's in the background instead of the main object) the legs look as if it were a
recluse, but the recluse have 6 eyes and in 3 pairs of duvets or something like that. It's
somewhat like a recluse and somewhat not. there is no violin, lots of hair though. very long legs which the perimeter around the spider's legs stretched out would probably be about 9 inches. the diameter about 3-4 inches.

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10 November, 2005:
I live in Seattle and found this fellow in my bathroom this morning. Pretty big about 1 Ĺ - 2 inches across.
Thanks
Robert

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Reply: You have a picture on your website, dated 8 November, 2005, that someone claims is a " spider egg sack. " Actually, it's just a dead spider, covered with fungus. I've got several pictures of them from my parent's basement. Dennis

8 November, 2005:
Hi: If you can help. the attached pics are of a spider egg sack. We found  many of them in our basement. At first glance they look like mean  dangerous venomous spiders but if you look close you can see they are  dummies made from spider silk to look like a mean spider. I would bet  the parents are small and not scary so they built a scarecrow. What are  they. thank you for any help you can add.
Peter Vinci
peterv@ipatools.com

.

Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion. It  is related to spiders and scorpions, but it's really neither one. It hides in thin rock crevices by day and comes out at night to hunt, aided by its long, sensitive antennae. It has no venom and is harmless to humans.

8 November, 2005:
Great web site! And, here's another photo for you... Can you help me ID this guy? It was in the house (Tucson, Arizona),
stalking my cat. About 3" wide. It ran sideways as fast as it ran  forward - quite disturbing!
Thanks for your help! Around here, everything seems to be poisonous -  just want to keep tabs on what is moving into my house with me.

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Reply: Hi, on this page you have a photo from Amanda in Philippi, WV dated November 8, 2005 of a beautiful spider that is unidentified. We have a similar spider on our deck (see attached), and have searched Google for a match. We found this website that appears to identify it exactly as an Orb Weaver - Genus Larinioides :  Thanks for your great website, Doug
8 November, 2005:
Hi, I live in Philippi, WV. This spider was on the outside of my window today, and I was wondering if you could help me identify it. I would have to say that it was about an inch long (rough approximation...did not measure). if you don't know what it is, it is a cool one that you can put on your website. thanks, Amanda
 

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Reply: Looks like a crab/flower spider.
6 November, 2005:
Hi Glen, A couple from England for you. Regards, Edwin
Click for a larger view.

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Reply: It looks like a House Spider - tegenaria domestica - glen

3 November, 2005:
Hi My name is Heidi. I live in Everett, WA. but I found this spider in Marysville, WA. Could you please tell me what type of spider this is? I find these all of the time in my house. I am deathly afraid of spiders. Thank you.

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2 November, 2005:
I found this little guy in a window sill...lucky thing! Cheers, Carine.

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Reply: This species is very, very easily confused with D.crocata, but in fact this is Trachelas tranquillus, the "broad-faced sac spider," which does have mild medical significance. Go here for more info - Nathan Hepworth
1 November, 2005:
This spider was in my home. I live in North Carolina, near the coast. I have never seen a spider like this before. It's legs look sort of red. Is it poisonous?
.
Reply: It looks like some sort of huntsman, probably Heteropoda venatoria - glen
30 October, 2005:
Hello Glen, I've attached two photos of a big spider taken in Hongshulin MRT station,
north of Taipei, in Taiwan. Unfortunately it was on the ceiling, and I couldn't get close to get a clear or bright photo. But I've cropped and adjusted the pictures as best I can, and while the quality isn't great, I think it's as good as many of the photos that other people have sent you.
(If you want the originals I can send them. They're about 2M each.) It's a while since I took the photo, but I think the spider was 10-15cm across. The MRT station is situated right next to some mangroves which line the mouth of the Tamshui River, and there are some original forest remnants on the hills nearby. I noticed that it looks very similar to the photo of
the one in mainland China. I've also attached a Google Earth "placeholder". If have that product installed, you can use the placeholder to see exactly where the photo was taken.
Regards, Keith.
.
Reply: That is a Dolomedes triton, six spotted fishing spider. It is harmless. Nathan Hepworth
28
October, 2005:
Hello! I found this sitting on my pool wall and cannot locate any pictures or info on this spider. Can you help me out? It looks black with blue but my wife says it is really black with white coloring/dots. Thank you very much for your time. My wife wants to know if it is harmful!
.

26 October, 2005:
Here are some cool spider photos I took the other day.

Hope someone can ID them!

Cheers,

Carine.
South Australia

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Reply: Certainly looks like a redback to me!!

24 October, 2005:
Hi There, I came across this little fellow inside an overturned kids sand pit in our back yard today and thought that it may be a relative of the red back family. Anyhow my kids would like to find out for sure and I would just like to know if you have ever come across one marked like this or if it is actually a red back.

Location: Kurri Kurri N.S.W

Thanks, Adrian, Bianca & Gabrielle

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Further info: Mystery spider has been positively identified at Meta Ovalis.
Hi Glen, I sent pic to Idaho, and got a response. I think it is a Meta Ovalis.
What do you think? JB
26 October, 2005:
I found this (and many more) spider in an abandoned US Military Bunker in Argentia, Newfoundland, Canada. It was the size of a silver dollar (legs and all). No noticeable web, they were on the bare concrete walls. No water sources nearby and unknow source of food as the bunkers are dry and bare. Can you help identify? I am a native to the area, and I have never seen one of these before. I wonder did US military bring in with equipment?Thanks, Jim Bishop

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Reply: This is a Solifugid. They are not venomous. See a pic here -
http://www.museums.org.za/bio/images/scorpions/sol4.jpg Brian Post
26 October, 2005:
Hi Glen,
I was wondering if you could tell me what type of spider this it. I found it in my back garden. I live in England(UK). It really gave me a fright when i saw this! I didn't know spiders this big are in the UK!  Chris ( I am on my mums account)

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26 October, 2005:
Hi, I'm a college student in north central Pennsylvania and found this spider
living on our curtain in our dorm. He looks like a fishing spider, but I'm not
so sure. Just figured that I'd send you a picture of him =)

Tara

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Reply: Be careful with this one as it resembles a yellow sac spider which can give a nasty bite. Click here for more info.

23 October, 2005:
I found this spider above my fridge and I don't know what it is? its about  the size of a dime and very fast. please help. Thanks, Josh.

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Reply: This is not a hobo. It is Agelenopsis, a grass spider. If you found it in NY, it is probably pennsylvanicus sp. I live in New Jersey and this is one of the most common spiders I see in the area. They are not dangerous and their bite would not cause anything resembling a hobo or recluse bite. In the area of the USA you live in, the only spider whose bite could be misdiagnosed as a recluse is the yellow sac spider. See more on the yellow sac spider here - http://www.srv.net/~dkv/hobospider/yellosac.html Brian Post
18 October, 2005:
I have taken this photo of a spider in my basement. After viewing your webpage, I thought this spider resembled a Hobo spider, but I live in New York and it sounds like they reside in the Northwest, not the Northeast. I have seen many of these in my basement and garage and in fact my next door neighbor had a bite that was said to have likely been caused by a recluse spider. As I have learned from your page many Hobo bites are mistaken for recluse bites. I hope someone can identify it, as I had a monster of one in my shower the other night and would have hated to step near it in a grogging situation. I did prod this spider with a stick and it attacked and attached to it rapidly. Thank you for your time. Shawn

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17 October, 2005:
Hi Glen,
I found this spider in my house. Any idea what it is and whether or not it is harmful? It is about 2 inches long including its stretched legs.
Thanks,
--Samira

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Reply: They look like grass spiders/funnel weavers.
17 October, 2005:
I am horribly afraid of spiders, can you tell me what type this is? I live in Northeast Pennsylvania, I have seen quite a few of these in my house lately. all have been a bout the size of a quarter,up to the sixe of a 50 cent piece...some have had a narrower abdomen, but all the marking appear the same...


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Reply: That is Cheiracanthium inclusum, the yellow sac spider, which is medically
significant. - Nathan Hepworth

17 October, 2005:
PS. After seeing your site, I found the species of spider that live all  over our home. They appear to be sac spiders (again, see photo), and it  seems that maybe they aren't necessarily the best candidates as roommates.

..

13 October, 2005:
This one was found on the wall in my house. I live in Victoria, British Columbia. Just trying to put a name to the "face." Thanks , Adam

..
Reply:
In looking at other photos from this page http://www.whatsthatbug.com/spiders.html, they have it identified as a female trap door spider. Dianna Ray

3 October, 2005:
Hi Glen, Excellent site. I was hoping to have this aggressive spider identified. I live in San Antonio, TX. Found him today (10-12-05) in my garage crawling fairly slowly against the wall. Around an inch and a half long. Not the best climber as it had trouble climbing vertically out of a 2" cardboard lid. Reared up and attacked anything that got close to it (wet cotton ball, popsicle stick... I have a video clip if you want it.) I thought it might be a Southern House Spider, but doesn't quite fit the look. Looks very similar to a Sydney funnel spider, but I don't live in Australia, and perhaps it's a bit small. His fangs have quite a grip (on the stick). I didn't see any other spider that had such short, stout legs and the glossy body. Can you help me? I'm concerned about whether or not it is venomous since I have an 8 month old that's starting to crawl around. Also, any pointers on keeping him alive (feeding, shelter, etc?) Thanks a lot. Aaron

Click for a larger view.

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Reply: Probably some sort of argiope but a bit hard to tell from the underside view.
11 October, 2005:
I found this on the side of my house, and I canít tell what it is.

..

9 October, 2005:
He looks much like a Daddy long legs but he had 5 legs and 2 very long legs 7 all together. Attached are a couple photos I took.  I had to degrade the quality a bit to send them but have the originals if any more quality is needed. What kind of spider (or insect) is this?

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Reply: It is Dysdera crocata, a woodlouse hunter spider.

9 October, 2005:
Hello, I live in england on an island called the Isle of Wight and found this spider in the house... it was crawling very sluggishly and couldnt really move, even with a bit of a poke. So we put it outside and it died on us as soon as it touched the ground! Can you tell me what sort of spider it is please? We had never seen this type before! Thanks! Josef

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Reply: It is a grass spider/funnel weaver spider. They closely resemble wolf spiders but have the longer spinnerets at the back of the abdomen. They are not dangerous.

10 October, 2005:
We found this spider in our shed in Keaney, Nebraska. Can you tell us what type of spider it is. Your welcome to use this picture for your website.

Thanks!
Shawna Erbsen

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Reply: It is a male and some sort of a myglamorph. Possibly a Trapdoor.

7 October, 2005:
I found this big guy in a water bowl what kind is it and is it and is it harmful, it looks thicker bodied than I usually see around my area(coastal North Carolina)

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7 October, 2005:
The Silver back on this guy caught my eye at a Queensland rest stop.

Click for a larger view.

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Reply: The spider on the top appears to be a Dolomedes not sure what sp., see some
pics here http://departments.ozarks.edu/zooweb/new_page_8.htm. Brian Post

5 Octo
ber, 2005:
I just came across your site tonight, and thought I would share a couple of my many spider pictures. Both of these were taken in my backyard; one on the surface of my pool (2 inches long), and one in my driveway (3/4 inch long) ... K. Mason

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Reply: Tegenaria agrestis is commonly known as the hobo spiders and their bites can be quite bad becoming very infected with the skin necrotizing.  However not all bites have poison injected, many are dry and this does then not occur.

5 October, 2005:
Dear Glen
Some close friends said they found this spider on their stairs and weren't so comfortable with it in there house. strait away i new it was A Tegenaria agrestis I was wandering how bad the bite was although i've been bitten by many venomous spider and spiders that cause a blister such as the Argiope bruennichi so please tell me how venomous it is.

.

Another Reply: I was browsing your [2005 unidentified spiders] photos & i saw a tarantula [2 october 2005] you ID as a rosehair. It looks similar but i think it's more likely a male Texas Brown, i have 3 TBs & am considering a Rosehair. Bec
Another Reply
: I asked for identity and responce was Columbian Rose Hair Tarantula. I have since found it is a Chilean Rose Hair Tarantula. I enjoy your site very much. Carol
Reply:
  This is a Columbian Rose Hair Tarantula. I have a female. This person is right in identifying it as a male. Don

2 October, 2005:
I know this is a male; every year at this time a tarantula walks through our patio on it's way to find a mate. I just do not know the name of this particular tarantula.
cdenil, Boulder City, NV

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Reply:
This spider appears to be a Steatoda triangulosa, see a pic here -  Brian Post

2 October, 2005:
Any idea what this fellow might be? He was in an asymmetrical web  outside of my guitar case near the floor of the music room. I'll send some more pictures. Thanks. Mark Vancil

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Reply: That is a male Steatoda sp. (
poss' S. borealis ) "false widow." Nathan Hepworth

30 September, 2005:
I was wondering what kind of spider is this. I live in Anchorage Alaska.  Thank you for your time. Sandy

 

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30 September, 2005:
Could you please how me ID this spider? I live in Northeast Ohio.

Thanks,
Roy

 

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Reply: This is a type of huntsman - Badge (Huntsman) Spider (Neosparassus diana)
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/spiders/detail.aspx?id=0&pic=3

28 September, 2005:
Glen ,further to my reply I don't have a camera suitable for closeups so tried scanning and have attached the results. Regards Doug. T

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Reply: This is Castianera amoena, an ant mimicking spider. Thanks to Matt.

28 September, 2005:
Found this spider this summer in northwest Arkansas. I saw that someone posted a similar one on Aug 21, 2005. Any idea on the ID? I forgot to post information about the size. It was about one cm long, pictures were taken through a dissecting microscope. Thanks for posting them. Thanks, Ricky

Click for a larger view.

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Reply: Looks more like some sort of Araneus. glen

27 September, 2005:
Hi Glen, I was recently in Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada and found this spider on my backpack. I've included two photos of it and was wondering if you could help me identify it. I thought it might be a wolf spider as they are common in this area but I am unsure. Thanks in advance, Laurie March

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Reply:  I agree it does look like a spitting spider. glen
Update:
Why is it that I can find a spider that matches mine AFTER I send it? Anyway Ė looks to be a spitting spider, but could be mistaken. Dave
23 September, 2005:
Have these pretty much all over (9 of them last night) the outside of my house here in San Antonio. Appears to have 6 eyes, however, no violin marking. Understood that not all recluse have the violin. Is this a desert recluse? Also, found 8 more black widows on the house last night (1 inside). Weíll have to learn to co-exist. Dave B, San Antonio, Texas

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22 September, 2005:
Hi Glenda, Another one from England for you, hope you like it, found it out on the moors.
Cheers, Eddie  Click for a larger view.

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22 September, 2005:
As much as I hate spiders, they seem to like me and my camera, so I've taken some shots of some beauties. Two of these are garden orb weavers (at least I think that's what they are), both of whom have lived in my back yard in Southern California at some point this year. The one in the nighttime photographs had an incredibly beautiful web and my fiancť's and I spent plenty of time just watching her work. The ominous and HUGE yellowish/whitish and black beauty remains a mystery to me. (Any guesses what make and model she is??) She was oblivious to me and the other hikers who were marveling over her during a hike into Waimea Canyon on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai last December. Fascinating, beautiful creatures -- just so long as they stay out of my house!  Lori L. Drawbaugh

Reply: These look like some sort of argiope.

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22 September, 2005:
These guys were from the ocean trip Orb Weavers I think. Two of these are the same guy-Rich Swanner Click for a larger view.

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22 September, 2005:
Hello I live in Seattle WA, and have found a few of this same type of spider in my house over the last six months or so. I found this little guy sprinting across my bed sheets last night, and would like to know if it's anything I should worry about. Any help you could offer would be appreciated! Keep up the awesome work on the website, too! Thanks. Zack

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21 September, 2005:
Also, forwarded a picture of a large, unknown spider. Possibly Carolina wolf? Quite large Ė would estimate 4Ē or more legspan.

Dave B, San Antonio, Texas

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Reply: This is a Brown Widow, Latrodectus geometricus. While its venom is not as potent as other Latrodectus sp., it can still cause a medically significant reaction so be careful.
Brian Post

19 September, 2005:
This spider was on my front porch, what kind is it and is it harmful, troy

Troy Crosby

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Reply: This is a Lycosa aspersa. It is similar to some Dolomedes, but the eyes are different and the abdomen of the aspersa is more rounded. See the pic here - Brian Post

17 September, 2005:
Hello, I just moved from Germany to Little Rock, Arkansas and found this morning
a  big spider (dead) in our garage. Since I moved to the US and I found your  web Site I can handle the spiders a little bit better :-)) Your web site gave me so much information and finally I am leaving the house :-)) I attached the picture and I would be very thankful if you could tell what  kind it is. We have a little daughter (3 yr) and a very tiny Chihuahua so I am very scared. I looked all over your web page but couldn't find this one.
Thank you so much in advance!
Aleksandra Wight

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Reply: This is a Lynx spider, possibly Peucetia viridans. Its bite is believed to not be dangerous to humans.  Brian Post

16 September, 2005:
What is this?

.

15 September, 2005:
To whom it may concern, I found this spider in my garage tonight and it scared me to death. I don't like spiders and I seem to have found more and more even in the house this year. I have never seen on like this before. Please can you help me in telling me what kind it might be. This picture I did as close to actual size as possible. It was what I consider HUGE! I usually put diazinon down but haven't this year except once so I figure this is why Im having a problem. I I have seen big ones in the house as well and I really don't like that. I also was bitten by what my doctor said a brown recluse last year and was on antibiotic for the bite. I love my yard work but now don 't like it as well with the increase in spiders. I hope you can email me ASAP on the type this might be. Thank you. By the way, your web site is really great though I shouldn't have looked at before going to bed.  thank you again, It's Wed. night the 14th now.  Marjie
mpowgarden@earthlink.net

Reply: This spider looks like a Southern house spider, Kukulcania hibernalis. Its bite is believed to not be dangerous to humans.
Brian Post

.

11 November, 2005:
Another Reply: With regards to the response by Jim to the spider on September 15, 2005, I thought I'd send a few pictures of the black widow I found without the hourglass marking on the underside. I don't know if you can use this at all, but if so, I'm glad to share it. Elaine

Some more info: Your site is certainly informative and interesting, although the weird stuff I come across now and then, I can never seem to find, seems there are tons of spiders here in Ohio that haven't been classified yet, oh well. Any rate, there was one thing I noticed you posted and I think you should be aware of it, less someone thinks the pretty shiny large black spider crawling out of their newspaper is harmless because it doesn't have a red hourglass. The northern black widow found in my area can have no discernible red mark or marks on the underside at all. I have found a couple in my 1920s home, one on my porch, in newspapers I brought in to start fire and the other outside in an old camper, I am vary familiar with widows and am not a novice, I have caught many in Florida while visiting there (they did have an hourglass of course) and I have since learned they can have a slight yellowish mark also, but have never seen this first hand. This is in reply to this you posted, again, nice site, thanks, Jim

 

 Reply: This looks like a Black Widow, probably Latrodectus mactans. I cannot be sure without seeing the red hourglass shape found on the underbelly, but Black Widow bites are medically significant, so be careful.
Brian Post

15 September, 2005:
Hi I was just wondering if you know what kind of spider this is. I found it crawling up my wall one morning. Thank you.
Brooke

.

Update: Glen, I don't know if you remember I sent you these pics a while back for identification, just thought I'd let you know I sent these pics to ohio unversity and took the spider to our extension office and found out it's a wolf spider.
14 September, 2005:
I found this spider in my house and almost had a heart attack. It's the biggest spider I've ever seen.  It's all black, top and bottom. It's about 2 1/2 inches long and about 1 1/2 wide. I've looked all over the  internet but can't find what kind it is. Your help would be appreciated.  The smaller spider next to it is a grass spider which I use to consider large until I found this big boy.

.

Reply: I think the 9/13/05 spider is a Triangulate Orb Weaver. We have a lot of
those in Missouri. Thanks, Tim St. Louis

13 September, 2005:
Hi, We found this spider when we were doing some construction in Northern  Virginia... it's brighter red in color than the photos indicate. We  have searched your website from top to bottom and can't identify  it... can you help? Thanks! Ross Andrews
Manassas, VA

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12 September, 2005:

A great photo by Rich Swanner.


Click for a larger view.

.

Reply: The picture  looks like a common house spider (Tegenaria gigantea) and is found worldwide. Alan

9 September, 2005:
Hi, I think this spider is that of a Hobo...not 100% sure. I found it in my sink in the kitchen. I live in Kamloops British Columbia, Canada. After researching it is believed that it was introduced in Seattle Washington back in the 30's shipping cargo from Europe. Wow all the way up in Canada. There is a possibility that there are recluse spiders in our area as well. Thanks...hope this picture is clear enough.!

.

Reply: This looks like a funnel weaver spider.
9 September, 2005:
Hi, This spider has been living in a hole behind my shutter in the front window. We've been watching him for about 2 weeks. My husband was going to remove his web before we knew he was living in there. I told him to leave it so we can watch him. I've been looking at pictures and I can't seem to match him up to any on your site. He looks a little like the
grass spider, but mine looks a lot bigger in the rear. Can you possibly send this on to your people that identify or can you identify yourself. Thanks for you time. Sincerely, Elle Wolpert/2 inches long including legs. Thanks!!!

.

Reply: That is a Heteropoda venatoria huntsman spider. They are not dangerous, but they do have a painful bite. Nathan Hepworth

8 September, 2005:
Hello, I found this spider stuck in the door jam of my car today! I live in Sarasota, Florida. From the various photos I have seen on the web it looks like either a wolf spider (although it does not appear to be hairy like the ones in your other photos) or a brown widow. Could you shed some light on what it is? Also if I should worry about a nest in my car! Thanks a bunch, Holly

.

Reply: This looks like a funnel weaver spider.

7 September, 2005:
Hi Glen -  What a fantastic site you have!! I have a tidbit for your Denver, CO individual (4th picture down on your main page today) who's entry is dated October 18, 2004. The spider has to horn shaped formations on it's abdomen. I also live in Denver, CO and had the exact same spider living in the crook of a tree outside my front door the summer of 2000. I sent it about the internet a bit and got an email back from an entemologist in Brussels. He said it was most likely some type of a common barn orb spider. Also, I found this guy in my basement....he was on his last legs when I found him. I think he must be some sort of wolf spider, but I'd really like to know. I doubt he's poisonous, but again, would really love to know. He is about 1 1/2 inches long including legs. Thanks!!!

.

Reply: That is an Araneus sp. orbweaver, possibly A. cavaticus. It is harmless. Nathan

6 September, 2005:
Hi, I found this spider while visiting family in Northern Michigan, and am not sure what it is. It's very large, would cover at least the palm of my hand, and was not aggressive. It did not build a web, so I know it would be some type of hunter.  Thank you!  Mandy

.

Reply: This looks like a fishing spider.

6 September, 2005:
Hello, We recently spotted this spider in Northern Wisconsin but can't seem to
identify it. Thanks! Mike and Katie

.

Reply: Your spider is a Kukulcania hibernalis, the southern house spider, and she is
harmless. If you enjoy keeping spiders as pets, you should visit www.arachnoboards.com/ab if you haven't already done so. It is the hub of the invertebrate
keeping hobby in North America. Nathan

6 Sept, 2005:
Glen, Thanks soo much! I hope you are able to ID her. She's been a great spider (tarantula?); I've kept it for like 7 years or more. I've been tempted to hold it at times, but not knowing if it is dangerous, I've just stuck to feeding her. It recently molted which was really interesting to watch. I first found her in a small hole (no bigger then a dime) of a block wall, located in Palmdale (the climate is dry and desert like). The web is pretty sticky and funnel like. If you have any questions, just let me know. Best to you! Ken

.

Reply: This is a black and yellow argiope. I am getting around 5 emails a day about these spiders and they have their own page so please check it out before emailing!!

5 September, 2005:
I notice this spider while I was gathering Snap Dragon Flower seeds. A search of the internet has turned up nothing.
Richard Hoag
Walled Lake MI

.

Reply: It  looks like the harmless "grass spider" or funnel weaver, species Agelenopsis pennsylvanica, same as the one below. They are very similar to wolf spider but have longer posterior spinnerets.

2 Sept, 2005:
HI live in Bartlett, Illinois, near Chicago. This thing was in my garage  at 2 am last night. Any clue as to what kind of spider it is?

....

Reply: It  looks like some sort of jumping spider.

1 Sept, 2005:
Hello, I live in south florida and came accross this spider which I have  never seen, it is under 1/2 inch large and lived in a furry type of web  in the corner of my garage. I tried looking it up on the internet but was unable to find anything on it. Thanks for your help.

-Chris

....

Reply: It  looks like the harmless "grass spider", species Agelenopsis pennsylvanica, sent in on 16 August.

1 Sept, 2005:
We hope you can help us out. We just moved into a new house and have found two of these things climbing up our walls in the last week. They have both been about the size of a quarter. We live in Iowa...can you tell us what type of spider you think this is? We were looking through your site (very nice, by the way) and were unsure if we were dealing with a funnel or a hobo spider. Since we have a new baby, we would like to be sure what we are dealing with and if there is any need to worry. Any input you can offer would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Mike & Jamie

....
Another Reply: The Tarantula on the left is a pink toed tarantula (Avicularia avicularia). Alan
Reply:
The tarantula is an Avicularia species, either A. avicularia, or A. metallica. They
are nervous and flighty, but typically very reluctant to bite. Even if one did bite you ( quite unlikely ) their venom is insignificant, causing almost no effects whatsoever. They actually make good pets! Nathan

Another Reply: The picture on the right looks like a common house spider (Tegenaria gigantea) and is found worldwide. Alan
Reply: The spider on the left is some sort of tarantula. The one on the right could be a
Tegenaria agrestis, the hobo spider, so be careful with that one.
1 September, 2005:
Can you tell me what kind of spider are those??

....
Another Reply: This spider is known as the Signature spider (Argope bruennichi). Alan
Reply:
The black and yellow spider at top is a species of Argiope orb weaver, the sleek brownish spider looks like a Gnaphosidae "ground spider," possibly a Haplodrassus sp. The white and brown spider at bottom is an Araneus diadematus "common European garden spider," and the small yellow one looks like a Cheiracanthium sp. "sac spider," which you should know are medically significant. See www.hobospider.org for more info on these. Nathan

30
August, 2005:
Dear Glen, I live in the German-speaking part of Switzerland and I'm always keeping an eye out for spiders. While surfing on your excellent website, I ended up admiring the pictures other viewers had sent in; so I decided to mail you some of my spider pictures, although they are a bit clumsy. About the attached photographs:
I discovered a beautiful yellow Argiope sunning itself on a wall near our house. I coaxed it into my bug-viewer and photographed it. After that, I found a fluffy brown spider wandering around my room - I am not certain about its identity, but it looks like a member of the Zelotes spiders.
I am also sending you a picture of an enormous garden cross spider which was searching for a place to settle down. Finally, I took a picture of a small greenish spider which, as a defense mechanism, lay on its back, folded up its legs in a knot and played dead. Hope you enjoy them! Kind regards, Rita

....
Reply: The photos from Peter Pohli in Snohomish Co. Washington are of a female Araneus diadematus, or common garden spider. They are sometimes called a cross spider because of the markings on the top of their abdomen that appear to form a white cross. They are found throughout the northern hemisphere and I wouldn't be surprised if they are in the southern hemisphere now too. The photo from Sabina in northern Ontario also appears to be the same kind of spider. Dan, Bothell Washington

28 August, 2005:
Thank you so much for your quick reply, it was well appreciated. Well, the  spider has left. I guess we disturbed it too much. But the web is gone, do  they recycle it so to speak? As well, I have another picture which shows it  back markings. I hope someone can help us, since our field guide does not  have it identified, nor have I found it in the years I have searched the
net. In sort of a post script, your site is fantastic and very informative.  It gave me the creeps however, which is a good thing, since I am phobic  about spiders. I of course do not kill them, all creatures have their place  within mother nature. Have a great day. Sabina

27 August, 2005:
Hi. We have found this spider a few years ago, but were never able to id it. We just found another one and are still stumped. We live in Northern, Ontario, Canada. Our spider had a web suspended from underneath our children's play mailbox. As the more squeamish of our family members, I have been left to search for its identity. I appreciate your information and how your replies emphasize that killing spiders is not recommended. Perhaps you can help us with this one. Sincere thanks Sabina. Click for a larger view.

....
Reply: That appears to be a Kukulcania hibernalis, the southern house spider. Nathan Hepworth

27 August, 2005:
Hi Glen, I checked your great webpage again but I donít seem to find a spider I found in my house the other day. Maybe you can help me? Thanks so much, I appreciate it, Julia
Click for a larger view.

....

26 August, 2005:
Hi there! Here's the picture of my spider. I was wondering if you can identify it. The picture is taken in my kitchen (doorway between the kitchen and laundry) in Western Sydney, Australia. Thanks,
Dragan

....
Reply: The photos from Peter Pohli in Snohomish Co. Washington are of a female Araneus diadematus, or common garden spider. They are sometimes called a cross spider because of the markings on the top of their abdomen that appear to form a white cross. They are found throughout the northern hemisphere and I wouldn't be surprised if they are in the southern hemisphere now too. The photo from Sabina in northern Ontario also appears to be the same kind of spider. Dan, Bothell Washington
Reply: Tegenaria agrestis is the hobo spider. This does not really look like one of these to me.

26 August, 2005:
Here are 4 photos of a spider found in Snohomish county, Washington. This spider is VERY common here. In my web searches, there is some disagreement as to which spider this is. The closest I could figure is that it is a Tegenaria agrestis. Does that look right to you? If not, what else might it be? I have a whole bunch of other photographs of this one and others like it. I particularly liked this one with the honeybee because it gives a good size scale. If you would like more photos, either to identify this one, or for your archives, please let me know and I'll be happy to send them to you. Thank you! Sincerely, Peter Pohli

....
Reply: The 2 pics in the middle are Steatoda triangulosa, see a pic here -  Brian Post

Reply: To the couple in Portland Oregon with the 3 spiders....the one that's white and red is called enoplognatha ovata ...Ciao!! Julie

26 August, 2005:
My fiancee and I have these 3 spiders, and others, claiming the outside of our apartment door home. We live in the Portland Metro Area of Oregon. Not too worried about these guys being poisonous. But my fiancee and I are curious as to what type of spider they are. I looked up many sites, and the closest i could find could possibly be a type of common house spider. But, don't really share the same markings. Quite interesting little things. The white one with the red markings on its back seems to be missing a couple legs, and has a somewhat clear body. The little guy just below the white one, I found crawling up towards the bigger one thats kinda stuffed its self in the corner, and when it reached the slightly bigger one, it wasn't too happy. They look like they get roughly about the size of a nickel. Possibly belong to the same family? If you could let me know who these guys, or girls, are, it would be awesome! Enjoy posting these if ya want to! Thanx!

....
Reply: That is definitely NOT a brown widow. I would judge it to be a Steatoda sp, possibly
S. triangulosa. Nathan Hepworth

4 August, 2005:
Recently we found this spider under a petri plate in the fly room... The  spider was really cute and we were feeding it flies when it bit me... Since  then I have felt sick and I am going to go to the hospital today..  Apparently the spider is very aggressive and mean, despite its cute and
gentle appearance. The spider was found on Burnaby Mountain in BC, but it could have come from  anywhere in the whole world given its location of finding. Feel free to use this amazing spider in your gallery, and if you have any  thoughts as to what kind of spider he is please let me know. my colegue is convinced it is a deadly brown widow spider (because of its  brown color) i really don't think it is Thank you ~ Lisa

....

21 August, 2005:
Hey there! I've searched and searched, but I can't ID this spider. It kind of looks like a Castianeira gertschi, but the legs are striped. Maybe a variation? He was missing all his legs when I found him, and his bright red color caught my eye. Any ideas?
david

....

19 August, 2005:
Hello, My wife and I snapped this picture one night when we were going into a restaurant. The spider was in a tree and had a really strong web. It was there when we went back to our car, so I assumed that it lived there. We saw it in Vacaville, California in the USA. Do you have any idea what it is? Jeramy
 

....
Reply: That is a fishing spider, of the genus Dolomedes. The spider will definitely bite,
which may be rather painful, but its bite is not considered dangerous. Gestation of the eggsac should be in the neighborhood of 1-2 months, at which point several hundred spiderlings will emerge. The adults eat minnows, water bugs, and, on land, just about any insect smaller than they are. Nathan Hepworth

19 August, 2005:
This spider was hanging on what appeared to be an egg sack from the garage roof. Outstretched, she is probably about 4 inches long but with a petite body (pretty large face). We live in Durham, North Carolina -- any idea what it is? Is it an egg case? How long is gestation? How many babies? Will it bite? What does it eat? Thanks --
Tiki

....
16 August, 2005:
Dear Glen
i was in Switzerland beside a river and two long-jawed orb web spiders male and female swam towards me, I had never seen such a thing so I thought you might like to see these photos Enjoy!
Elias

....
Reply: That is a harmless "grass spider",
species Agelenopsis pennsylvanica. Nathan Hepworth

16 August, 2005:
Hey Glen, found this in my bathtub (in southern Ontario, just north of Toronto). Pretty sure it is the same as the spider sitting on the coin on your front page... and after looking through your site, I would say its either a Funnel Weaver or some type of Wolf Spider. Enjoy the pics! BTW, I scooped him up carefully and put him outside ;)  You can use those pictures on your site if you'd like. Jesse Glen

Click for a larger view.

....

Reply: I believe that is Agelenopsis
pennsylvanica,
the "grass spider." It is harmless. Nathan Hepworth

13 August, 2005:
I found this spider in my apartment and was wondering if you had any idea what it is. It does not resemble any of the ones you have on your site. It is the size of a quarter and brown.....but had light streaks running down it. The front half is like a hard shell with no hair......the back half had two small light streaks and has some hair.
thanks,
nick

....
Another Reply: This spider is commonly known as a rafter spider.(Pholcus phalangiodes) but many call it a daddy long legs spider. Alan
Reply:
This is the common type of daddy long legs that most people see in their homes.

12 August, 2005:
Hey I've visited your site a lot and used to be very scared of spiders but now its almost like I've got used to them as we get alot in this house. I find them fascinating and the other day I noticed a daddy long legs was sitting in my wardrobe with some eggs in its mouth. This morning I looked and they had all hatched! Will the mother stay with them for long like that or will they eventually just wander off? They just sit there for ages, I haven't seen them move, well until i gently blew the web! Anyway the main reason I sent the email was to show you this cool photo I took of another daddy long legs from the living room. It seems to have another spider in its jaw and I'm quite pleased with how the photo came out. At the highest res the detail is great!
How would it eat that spider? its almost bigger than the daddy long legs, would it last a few days? Oh and another question. I notice the spider has only 7 legs and their was one with just 6 a while ago. Do they grow back??  Thanks for the great website. I love checking the photos and identifying spiders with the help of it. For example I found a crab spider the other day and before i looked on your site i didn't know what the hell it was! I've learnt so much about spiders since visiting your site and its really helped me over come my fear! Sorry for all the questions! Mainly wanted to show you the photo's! Thanks David.
Click photo on left for larger view.

....
Reply: I would judge that to be Hogna lenta, the "field wolf spider." They are not
dangerous, but a bite would hurt. See this site:
http://www.floridanature.org/species.asp?species=Hogna_lenta Nathan Hepworth
 
11 August, 2005:
Hi Glen,
I live in Largo Florida and recently sprayed my yard for turf insects. Now I  am a Spider Hotel. These spiders are in my house 3-5 times a week. Can you  please tell me what they are??? Are they poisonous? Thanks, Kevin Day

....

Reply: That is a common orb weaver,
probably a Neoscona or Araneus species. It is
harmless. Nathan

11 August, 2005:
Hi... Can someone please tell me what kind of spider this is?
Discovery Bay, CA
Northern California
Thanks!
Kimberly

....
10 August, 2005:
hi there, ive attached a few photos of a spider that i found crawling on my basement floor. I've looked around and the closest match i can find to it is a wolf spider. I'd like to know if I'm right or if I'm not then what kind it is. I also read that wolf spiders are poisonous and dangerous, etc. so i'd like to know if I, or my family, are in any harm. My room is in the basement next to a window well, where most of them seem to be, so i'd especially like to know if i'm in any harm. I say that most of them are in the window well, meaning we have four window wells and in
each of them is about four or five of these, all
ranging in different sizes. I am not particularly
afraid of spiders, that is I am only afraid of the
brown recluse. But where i live i dont think i have anything to worry about. I actually love spiders and would like to know a lot more about them, thats mostly while i decided to contact you about this big guy. So im sending a few pictures. I think hes about 2 inches with the extent of his legs. And if you have any
information that would be much appreciated. Thanks

Reply: That is Rabidosa rabida, the "rabid
wolf spider". Despite its name, the species is
harmless. Nathan Hepworth

....
Reply: That looks to be a species of
Dolomedes fishing spider, which are harmless. Nathan Hepworth

9 August, 2005:

Hi,
I found this large spider on my porch in Georgia, you can see it's babys have just hatched. I tried to find it on your website with no luck. Perhaps you could tell me what kind it is. I really appreciate it! thanks!
Angie

....
Reply: It's between two species: Callobius
severus and Amaurobius ferox, but I am pretty sure its the Callobius. In either case your spider isn't dangerous. Nathan Hepworth

9 August, 2005:
Hi, found this spider on my BBQ cover, about the size of a fifty-cent pieceÖ

-Randall
 

Click for a larger view.

....
Reply: the brown Spider to the left appears to be a Tegenaria funnel weaver, and the red spider is a Dysdera crocata, the "woodlouse hunter". The Dysdera can cause a blistering rash if it bites, but isn't considered dangerous. There is only one Tegenaria sp. that is harmful- T. agrestis ( the "hobo spider" ). I can't tell from the pic which species yours is, but since you say it was/ is pretty large, I'd say it is not the agrestis, since T. agrestis is not very large. Nathan.

7 August, 2005:
Hello, 2 days ago I found a red spider on my brothers living room carpet, To my serprise it was a bright red, and I have never seen a red spider in my life, They must be extremely rare in England, Uk. 2 hours later I went into the bathroom and found a HUGE!!! spider, the legs of it are so long and its a beautiful spider but I am terrorfied of them, Even writing this email I get shivers down my spine. Please can you give me any advise on these spiders, possible identify them for me? im too scared to even sleep at night anymore :( either way please let me know what you think and feel free to use the images on your website.
p.s: (Yes I'm a guy, too your serprise!) you probably think im a whimp.. but there is something about spiders.. argh anyway thank you.

....
Reply: This looks like a wolf spider - Rabidosa rabida "rabid wolf spider". Nathan
6 August, 2005:
Okay I found this lovely spider in my kitchen at 1 in the morning!  I thought you could add it to your collection if you wanted to, but I
would really like to know what it is.  I have NEVER seen a spider  this big! I screamed so loud that my neighbor came over in her PJ's
to ask what was the trouble. I am so scared of these things. Thanks  to my handy dandy Hot Shot Killer it did the job in about 30
seconds! I guesstimate that he is about 2 inches long from leg to  leg. Any information would be greatly appreciated!

Click for a larger view.

....
Reply: Looks like a Xysticus species crab spider. Nathan Hepworth

6 August, 2005:
I found this spider outside my NE Texas home under some weeds in my flower garden. I wonder what kind it is? It refused to run when I tried to herd it away from the area where I was weeding, and instead raised itself onto its 2 hindmost legs and attacked the stick! It was so aggressive, I thought it best to learn more... It had no web nearby that I could find, and has remained amazingly still since I put him in the jar. He is about1/2" diameter including legs, he (or she?) is a lovely but assertive spider! Thanks to anyone who can tell me more. -Photo attached

....
Reply: I'd say that's a Dysdera crocata "woodlouse hunter," which isn't dangerous except that its bite may cause a blistery rash.  Nathan Hepworth

6 August, 2005:
Could you please tell me what this spider is and if it is harmful? Itís about an inch in size and was found in my basement where my teen son sleeps. Iíve never seen one in my 46 years and canít find anything identical on the web. I'm concerned.
Andrina xx

....
That looks to me like it could be a wolf spider. Please have a look at the photos from 30 September, 2004. (there's a link at the top of this page to the 2004 pics ). Nathan Hepworth

6 August, 2005:
Hi, We live in Cyprus and have just gently but firmly turfed this spider out of our house! Iíve looked thru all the photos on your site and I thought it was probably a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, but Iíve looked this up on numerous web-sites and it says it lives on or around water, this is the middle of the hottest part of the summer and we are many kilometres away from any water (although I do have a large grassy garden which is watered every day)
We have two dogs; do any of us need to worry?
Many thanks
Andrina xx

....
Reply: This looks like a hobo spider, so be careful.
5 August, 2005:
I don't believe I've seen this one on your spider pages....and I'm not sure what it is. It was darn fast though.



 

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