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Spider Photos 2007 (3)

Here's Page 3 of some unidentified spider photos sent in by viewers from 2007. Please choose a section below.

Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders

UNIDENTIFIED SPIDERS

Another Reply: Freshly molted Steatoda sp. Kevin L.

Reply: It still is possibly a steadota, they may be brown, reddish or black with most species exhibiting a white band at the front of the dorsal abdomen which may resemble a collar.

29 December
, 2007:
This spider was in my sofa bed. i have never seen one before could you tell me where i might find out more information about it? i thought it was a steadota but they all seem to be brown and this is black with greenish grey legs. will it bite my company? feel free to use these if you like . thanks melissa

 

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Reply: These are brown widow egg sacs, you can tell from the landmine shape and the spider next to them.
27 December
, 2007:
Hi, We were at my Mom's in Long Beach, California and found this spider on the chair. From your website it seems similar to the house spider, but the eggs seem very peculiar, they remind me of landmines. Any ideas? Thank you in advance for your resources! Great website!! Lori T. San Francisco, CA.
 

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Another Reply: Found your web site very interesting... I don't know if you mind the help but I was looking through your unknown pics and on the "27 December, 2007:" of Cape Town The nest looks very simular to a rain spider nest here is a few links. http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/arachnids/spiders/sparassidae/palystes.htm
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/181/411339234_96c74d724a.jpg -
Robert

Reply:
Sorry but I can't tell from the cocoon, it looks a bit big for a spider. Maybe someone from Cape Town will recognise it.

27 December, 2007:

Hi Glen, I am an 11 year old boy on holiday in Cape Town. I found this cocoon in the
flowers next to the pool. My dad took the photos. Do you know what kind of spider it is? Regards Jake
...

Reply: The pictures are not very clear but this could be a tailed spider possibly a scorpion tailed spider. Arachnura higginsi.

27 December, 2007:

The spider I found looks like a scorpion, it’s body looks like a spider with the eight legs, and front pinchers, but it has a tail with a barb on the end of it, and the tail is almost same length as body, the spider has a white back (which looks like it is separate from the body) which extends up the tail, with caramel colour legs, under bell and head. Size: approx Lenght 2cm in total from head to barb. Width 5mm. Body, 1cm. legs extended.  Please advise if this spider is something that needs to be looked at. I am in Baulkham Hills, Sydney
...

15 December, 2007:
Hi Glen My name is Jan. I reside in Pretoria, Gauteng South Africa. Our country has a very diverse wildlife with a large variety of which are creepy crawlies. I love spiders, snakes, amphibians and all living things who can not speak for themselves. Once bitten, you can not help but marvel at what a great artist the Creator is. Love your web site. Please find of my private collection photos. I unfortunately had to cut the picture on Paint to conserve space. I also included my computer backdrop. These are all from the Orb family. These particular ones lived under my friend’s roof overhang in Pine Town, Kwazulu Natal. We counted roughly 40 of them around the windows. We decided not to disturb them due to the protection they offered against a potential break in (ecological balance). Best deterrent in the world. If you take in consideration the crime rate in our country, to live on a farm incident free for two years is remarkable here. Will send you some of my not so clear photos, if interested. All these photos were taken with my cell-phone when I encountered them on and around our Farm in Pretoria. By the way, the photo of the Sun Spider from South Africa was pretty. We know them as Red Roman’s here. They are well known for attacking and eating scorpions. It's usually a very fair fight. The looser gets eaten. We were privileged enough to catch and release one at work here last week. They fall under the endangered species list in South Africa. However, there are still some idiots who kill these beautiful critters. Why are they so afraid of them, we are quite a lot larger and stronger. Regards, Jan

...

Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph but definitely not a Sydney Funnel Web. It is probably a trapdoor spider.

15 December, 2007:
I came across this in my living room and took a picture of it before letting it go outside. I then looked on the internet and found some similarities to the Sydney Funnel-Web .I was putting lights on my real Christmas tree when I noticed it walking across the floor. My guess is it came in on the tree. What kind of spider do you think it is? It was approximately 1 1/2 inches in length. I live in Carrollton Georgia, USA. Thanks Karl

Click for a larger view.

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2 December, 2007:
Hey Glen - Here are a few spider pics from recently caught critters; the first two are of an arachnid I haven't seen in my house before, not sure what species it is, but would be curious if you or any visitor to your site is familiar with this particular breed.  Catch ya Later, Mac.

News flash; I was digging around some Hobo spider sites while typing this email, and found a pic that looks a lot like the unknown one I submitted - they call it a Callobius. Have a look on page 5 of this doc and tell me what you think.

Click for a larger view.

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Another Reply: Calisoga sp. Kevin L.

Reply: This one looks like the one from California from 2 November, perhaps some sort of myglamorph but not sure.

11 November, 2007:
Found this spider in my hallway in Sonoma, California. I dropped a 9" pie dish over it (which will give you a better idea of it's size) until my husband could come to the rescue. Can you tell me what kind of spider it is?

Click for a larger view.
 

..

Reply: Not sure on this one, could be a wandering spider or could be a giant fishing spider.

11 November, 2007:
Hey, I found this one wearing my pants sitting in my bed drinking a beer. Thought you would like the photo. He lived. I put him outside, he came back in the next day and my dogs ate one of his legs, so I put
him across the street into the jungle last night. I think its a wandering spider but I have no idea. Nice web page!
Josh
Guatemala City, Central America

Click for a larger view.
 

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10 November, 2007:
I think this might be a hobo spider – can you please confirm? My son had 3 bites recently, one on his finger that caused his whole hand to swell up. We treated it with cortizone cream and homeopathic pills (Apis Mallifica, and all of the swelling has gone away in ~3 days. But I want to be careful to understand if this is the hobo spider, since I understand that if the bite were venomous, it could be far more serious. Please let me know what you think. Thanks, Andy


Click for a larger view.
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Another Reply: Probably Calisoga sp. Kevin L.

Reply: It could be some sort of myglamorph, but from this photo which doesn't show any detail, it's a bit hard to be sure.

2 November, 2007:
Hello, This spider was in my father's Northern California bathroom. Do you
have any idea what it is?

..

26 October, 2007:
I found this spider on the wall in our house and neither my dad or I knew what species it is. My dad used to work with venomous spiders and reptiles, and is quite knowledgeable when it comes to common spider species in our area (Western Washington), but this little guy I found, even stumped him. Some things I've noticed about watching this spider:
*Its entire body size can easily take up the area of a penny or more
*Its coloring and markings are unusual- they made me think of those zebra marked jumping spiders, but has no common features or movements to one. it is a darkish brown color, with *light brown, orange- tan stripe markings on its legs and abdomen, and it is a grayish color on its underside.
*It moves very, very quickly; it was hard to get it to stand still for a moment
*It has very large fangs for its body size
*its eye positions almost reminded me of a jumping spiders, but is not quite the same
*its body shape reminds me of slower moving spiders, not quick moving ones.
*My dad found another in the garage, aggressively chasing a brown recluse. yes chasing it. If you have any idea of the species, I would love to know asap, especially if it is considered more dangerous than the average carpet or grass spider.


 
..

Reply: Possibly Philodromidae  - Kevin L.

26 October, 2007:Glen, I know you get a lot of these, but you seem to continue to answer frequently so I figured I'd email and ask about the attached image. I live in the Chicago area and see these guys in my house a lot (exclusively except for some very small and prolific jumping spiders). I don't think they are dangerous but am intensely curious as to what kind of spider he is. I didn't shrink the image so you could zoom in if you'd like. Thanks in advance if you get around to looking! Feel free to use the image.
Brett

Click for a larger view.

..

Reply: It could be some sort of steadota - to which family the brown widow belongs. Brown widow egg sacs look like a miniature mine with spikes on it.

21 October, 2007:
Dear Glen, You have a great website and I appreciate you sharing your knowledge of spiders with us. I was wondering, would you please be able to help me identify a spider I captured in my basement tonight? I can't seem to find one like it on your site.  I have attached three photos of the spider. I think I must have several of these, as I walk through their almost invisible and fine webs frequently. Tonight was the first time I have been able see the web maker, however. Also, I do not know if it is related to the species in question or not, but I have several loose clusters of white eggs located in cobwebs throughout the basement ceiling rafters near the exterior walls. These eggs are roughly the size of peas, maybe even smaller. Any help is appreciated. And thank you again.
Sincerely, Doug, Kansas City, MO USA

..

Reply: This could be one of the Ancylometes species.

21 October, 2007:
I have frequently been looking at your site since I moved to Mexico in April and am fascinated, yet terrified of the spiders I come across. Here are a couple of photos. I think one is a tarantula (in the glass), at least that's what the locals tell me. There seems to be a lot of the other (yellow) one this time of year. (sorry about the blur). They stay outside. They are quite beautiful, but still don't like them!
Thanks, Marlene Davis, Guanajuato, Mexico

..



Reply: This is some sort of myglamorph, possibly a tarantula.

19 October, 2007:

Can anyone tell me what kind of spider this is and if it’s dangerous?

Click for a larger view.



 

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Reply: That looks like the tunnelweb spider to me. It's a male by the looks of it.  - Phil Sirvid, Entomology Section, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
13 October, 2007:
Hi. I was wondering if you could help me identify this spider? It was seen in the Southern End of the North Island in New Zealand, I can't remember where exactly. I've been looking about for a couple of months now, and although I can find similar looking tarantulas, I can't find any pictures of what appear to be the same spider, I was just wondering if you could help in any way, or post a picture on your website to see if any of your visitors have any idea. Feel free to take them and use them on your website if they are of any interest to you. Thank you if you can help, if not, that's cool, but feel free to use the pics anyway. Lee
Click for a larger view.

..

13 October, 2007:
Can you please identify this spider? I've found a couple in my house but I've left them alone, they seem harmless enough? What do you think. From New Zealand. Thanks Lisa

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Reply: Probably Ctenidae - Kevin L

7 October, 2007:
Hi, I found your website while trying to find an ID for this spider (attached jpg). I stumbled across it in the SE Atlantic Rainforest in coastal Brazil about 200km east of Sao Paulo. It was at an ant swarm trying to get away from the ants. It was very large (the ants in the picture were about 1.25 to 1.5cm long for scale). It also hopped quite high. I first thought a frog was hopping towards me. When I bent down to take the photo, it raised its front two legs, presumably as a defence. Anyway, if you can help me to find out what it is I'd be most interested. Thanks, Nick



 

..

Reply: This a Feather-legged Spider,
Uloborus sp. (Uloboridae). The shape, leg position, and setal brushes on Tibia I
are characteristic of this genus.
 Richard

7 October, 2007:
Hello. My name is Blair. I live in Central Texas, and I have a very peculiar spider on my porch. I have been browsing through your site for days, and have yet to find a spider that even resembles it!!! Please help~

 

..

Reply: This is a Bolas Spider, specifically Mastophora cornigera and those are beautiful photos not just of the spider but its very unique egg sacs. Levi (2003) wrote a revision of the genus and excellent photos can be found at this web site. Thanks to Richard for the ID.

6 October, 2007:
My neighbour found this spider and egg sacks on a Texas Umbrella tree. She asked me to look at it and let her know if it was harmless or poisonous. I came to your web site to look her up. She appears to be an orb web spider but doesn't exactly look like any pictures nor does the egg sacks. Would like to know what she is. We are located in So. Calif. near Temecula, CA. I assumed she was harmless and let her be. I am attaching photos I took of her, sorry about the quality.  You have a great spider site.  Thank you, Larry

Click for a larger view.

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Reply: This is an opilione, otherwise known as a harvestman or the other "Daddy longlegs". It has no venom and is not dangerous.

2 October, 2007:
I have never seen a spider like this before. It looks really creepy. I have quite a few outside my home. We live in West Texas, if that helps. Hope you can let me know. Hope this file is not too big. Thank You, Deborah
Click for a larger view.

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Reply: You have 2 funnel weavers, that's the stripey ones and the other with the big bum, looks like tegenaria gigantica - the giant house spider a relation of the hobo spiders which actually kills hobos if you have them in your area

1 October, 2007:
I caught all these in a cup after finding them on some boards in my backyard. I live in Utah, USA. The one on the top and bottom look similar but the one of the right had a HUGE "bum". Thanks! Dustin
Click for a larger view.

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Another Reply: Sparassidae Kevin L.
Reply: >This could be some sort of fishing spider.

30 September, 2007::
Cool!!
I'll send them on. Also, if you would like these pictures, please feel free to do with them as you please. There are three that I photographed while in the Phils and one while in Japan.  christopher

Click for a larger view.

...
30 September, 2007:
Hi Glen, We are trying to identify this spider. This is the first year that we have seen these spiders around our home. We typically have the writing spiders (argiopes). Thanks for your help. Wayne

Click for a larger view.

...
30 September, 2007:
Hey glen, I have had some problems sending you these pictures, but here goes again. Please let me know if you get them even if you can't identify it. Thanks again and post them on your site if you wish. Michael

...
A Reply from Carl: Gasteracantha sp.

30 September, 2007:
Hey glen, I have had some problems sending you these pictures, but here goes again. Please let me know if you get them even if you can't identify it. Thanks again and post them on your site if you wish. Michael

...
Reply: The smaller ones are probably males. Can't see if it has the protruding spinnerets to be sure it is a funnel weaver though.

16 September, 2007:

Hi! Love your website! Attached is a picture of what I believe is a Funnel Weaver in it's web in our basement inside window. Feel free to use it if you like  We live in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The question I do have is about the smaller skinnier (narrow bodied) spiders running around on these ladies' webs (I've only ever seen one or a dead one per web). Am I correct in my deduction that these
are the males? They do appear to have the (can't think of the actual word) sperm sacks in front. I believe they are funnel weavers because outdoors, they usually make their funnel shaped webs in the grass or at the top of hedges, but they do seem to love our window wells as well as the basement window casings for their homes. Thanks so much! Charleste

Click for a larger view.

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Reply: Wolf spiders don't usually live in trees. Not sure on this one, any ideas please??
16 September, 2007:
Hi Glen, I found this spider in a palo verde tree (only a few inches up) in  our backyard. I'm concerned because my son plays in the area a lot.  My guess is a wolf spider, but wanted to see what you think. Sorry, I forgot to mention that I live in Phoenix, Arizona. I've also
attached another photo of the same spider, showing his/her underside. Thanks for your help; this is a great site! Osha
 
Click for a larger view.

...
Reply: It is a myglamorph as you can see from the book lungs. It has the colouring of a woodlouse hunter but they aren't mygalomorph. There is a red legged purse web  spider that is similar but has a darker abdomen.!! Any ideas please??
14 September, 2007:
Hi- I was hoping you could help identify a spider I found. I found it by accident as I was digging a hole near Augusta, GA, USA. I didn’t see a funnel web or hole that could be its “home.” When I noticed the spider on top of the dirt, I had dug down about a foot. It kept burrowing just beneath the surface of the dirt, even when I placed it in a container to get pictures of it. (It's still alive and I plan on releasing it soon.) It seems slow moving and non-aggressive, and even laid there for several seconds like it was dead when I flipped it over on its back. I noticed the book lungs on its underside. It measures approx. 1”from head to end of abdomen, and the abdomen is approx. 5/16” wide.  Its legs are somewhat short, compared to similar spiders like the southern house spider, and the nearly opaque abdomen is not that common in the mygalomorphs. (At least not in your photo gallery pictures.) It is more common in the woodlouse family of spiders. It looks like some type of mygalomorph; possibly a trapdoor or purse-web. I thought it could be a woodlouse spider, but it seems to only have maybe 4 eyes in the front, and they are not arranged in a semicircle. Any idea what type of spider this is? Should I be worried that this spider might hurt my Australian Shepherd dog or my outdoor cat? Thanks, Karen
Click for a larger view.

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8 September, 2007:
Hi glen, I was just wondering if you could help me identify a couple of spiders I found in or around my house. Thanks in advance for any information you can give me.
Trishia from Fenton, Missouri

Click for a larger view.

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3 September, 2007:
Hi,again Glen. I was hoping that you could help me I.D. this spider. We are infested with hundreds of these little spiders in our garage and all over the kids outdoor toys and I am freaking out. They have round bodies and pointy needle-like legs like widows, but their egg sacs are smaller than the black widows. Their egg sacs are round and creamy and look like kix cereal and they have several egg sacs near each other. The spiders are all similar in color but vary from tan, gray, cream and brown. They are between 1/3 and 1/2 the size of a full grown black widow. We do have actual black widows all over the property too. I never saw any black widows in the garage so I assume that they are not the immature black widows, but I may be wrong. I figured that if they were the babies then mom would be nearby. l know they are not brown widows because their egg sacs do not have the spikes on them. Do you think they are another type of widow or anything poisonous ? I even asked my exterminator and he did not even know and I read books and researched the internet and still cannot make a positive I.D. Please help me if you can. Thank you so much.
Another Reply: Steatoda sp. Kevin L.
 

 

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Reply: This looks like the Velvet Ant here which is actually a wasp.

3 September, 2007:

Also I am sending a picture of a Red Spider type thing we have here, is this a Velvet Ant or is it a spider? are they poisonous? If you could let me know I would be most grateful. I am scared to death of spiders and it has been hard looking at all the pictures let alone having this one in my home in a gallon jar. lol She is kind of cute though.
Thanks, Melissa

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Another Reply: Hello. A camel spider on page: are false. Its are make by a man for a friend: Bye bye.

Reply: This is a really interesting creature. It appears to have 3 body parts and the string lines all around it are interesting.

3 September, 2007:

hi found this on holiday its reminds me of a solfgid (camel spider) im not relly sure plz help. thnx dude

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Reply: The first one is too hard to tell what it is because I can't see its markings or eyes well enough. The second one could be one of the steatoda family of spiders which does include the redback and widow spiders.
Another Reply: Thanatus vulgaris(or other similar species.) Kevin L.

30
August 2007:
Hi. Came across your website looking for pictures of spiders to do a leadlight – great website.  I have recently begun photographing spiders around my house in Adelaide. I have attached two and was wondering if you could tell me what they are. I have looked through a few books and the white one seems to be a type of ‘redback’. Is this correct?
Thanks, Warren

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Another Reply: These appear to be sparassids, both with egg sacs near hatching. Kevin L.

Reply: From this angle its too hard to tell what the spider is. This is a female though and she is protecting her egg sac.

30 August 2007:
I live in savannah, GA and found 'her' at a job site. She was hiding in a stack of old boards I had to move. Thank you.

...
Reply: This is a long jawed spider (Tetragnatha rubriventris ).
30
August 2007:
Hi !!! here are some pics of a spider i've never seen before, feel free to them use on your website, but if someone else is interested in using them please have them contact me. These were taken in Montreal, Canada. Hope you can identify it, very nice website B.T.W. it makes spiders fascinating and not repulsive!!! Thanks, Gilles

...
Another reply from Becky: These are very common spiders here in Florida where I live. They are both southern house spiders. The lighter coloured one is the male, the darker one is female. Hope this helps some. Love your site.

Reply: The dark one looks like a Southern House Spider, not sure of the other one.

24 August 2007:
They were not fighting each other. they look completely opposite but they were being very friendly to each other. i even took a video of them but the file might be too big for this email. i dunno. anyway let me know so next time i step onto the steps with no shoes ill know hat to do. thanks. -erin

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Reply: Not sure of the first one, could be a male orb weaver. The one snacking on it looks like a member of the steatoda family to which the widows belong but I can't see any red on it so it's probably just a house spider.
20
August 2007:
Here are a couple of pictures of spiders I was watching in-between the window panes. This is in Dallas Texas. The pic of the one with hairy legs was snapped right before the other spider aggressively attacked it and spun it up in web. Was wondering if you know what kind of spiders either of these are? The hairy legged one was about a centimeter in diameter including it’s legs. Thanks, C.Smith

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Another Reply: These appear to be sparassids, both with egg sacs near hatching. Kevin L.
Reply: From this angle its too hard to tell what the spider is. Photos sent in should give a clear picture of the top of the spider and any markings etc. Often you can only tell the difference by counting the rows of eyes. This is a female though and she is protecting her egg sac.

19 August 2007::
I live in savannah, GA and found 'her' at a job site. She was hiding in a stack of old boards I had to move. Thank you.

...
Reply: This a beautiful photo of a female Parasteatoda tepidariorum (previously Achaearanea tepidariorum)with her egg sac. This is a very common cosmopolitan synanthopic species and is found in homes throughout the U.S. Richard

17 August 2007:
Can you help me identify the spider in picture 1. I just killed a black widow spider (picture attached) in the near vicnity of this one. Thanks for any help. BTW, I live in Milton, FL (Northwest Florida Panhandle). That's where I found these on my back porch. One of my dogs was trying to eat the black widow when I stopped him. Sandy

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17 August 2007:
While I was in Africa I found some really neat spiders I thought I could share. One was the size of a baseball, all the way around! It was amazing! I found it on my parents' hotel room wall in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. The other one I actually had the nerve to pick up and handle, to put it outside where it belonged as opposed to the pit-stop bathroom sink I found it in near the Ngorongoro conservation area in Tanzania. I figured you and everyone else would enjoy those. n__n I don't know what any of these spiders are! So any help would be nice! And if the top one isn't even a spider, well... Haha, back to the drawing board it is!  Thanks a lot,Mallory

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Reply:
The spider identified as a possible hammock spider is a male common garden spider (araneus diadematus). It's a mature one and at this stage in its' life and it does not make a web. It's only interested in finding a female for mating. The female is usually bigger and more often than not ends up eating the male after mating. It's not dangerous. Dan
11 August 2007:
I am a self proclaimed Arachnaphobe
and just moved to New Hampshire, where apparently, there are many spiders! I freak out over the smallest house spider, so you can imagine my surprise (meltdown) when I see one of these suckers. I saw this one out on my deck this morning, climbing under one of my plants (that's really just a small tree). My boyfriend got a pretty good picture of it – can you help me identify it? I've been all over the web, and it kind of looks like a "hammock" spider – not sure though, I've never seen one like this before. Can you tell me if it's dangerous? Thanks for your help!

...
Reply: It is some sort of myglamorph which is indicated by the paler patches under the spider's abdomen which are its book lungs. It could be a trapdoor.

11 August 2007:
Hi Glen, We live just outside of Valencia city in Spain and found this spider in my daughter's bedroom this morning, we've seen others outside of the house, this is the first time we've seen one inside the house. I believe it to be a Wolf Spider but I would love for you to be able to tell me exactly what it is and whether it's venomous.

The photos show the spider in a pint glass 3 1/4 inches (8.5 cm) across. It is very defensive and rears up on it's back legs when you go near to it. These spiders seem to be nocturnal, we rarely see them in the daytime, this is the 6th or 7th sighting of them on our property this month. We have them every year, normally in July but this year they have appeared later than normal, we usually see the shedded skin of them as opposed to the living thing. Many thanks in advance for your help.  Sandi - Valencia, Spain

...

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