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Spider Photos - Argiopes 2007 (2)

Here's some photos of Argiopes,  mainly from the United States.  In Australia, we call our variety St. Andrew's Cross but in the United States they are more commonly called a Black and Yellow Argiope.  (Argiope aurantia). We have had so many queries and photos sent in of these from people who have never seen them in their area. It's quite incredible!! They are also known as Golden Garden Spiders or just Garden Spider and their scientific name is Argiope aurantia. New page - Black and yellow argiope laying her eggs courtesy of Joe Hollner. Click here for the page and some great shots!!  I also have a couple of fantastic videos sent in by Joe. Video 1 (8,992Kb) Video 2 (16,321Kb)
Please choose a section.
Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    

ARGIOPE

The number of emails we've had from people in the United States trying to identify the Black and Yellow Argiope or St Andrew's Cross spider (as we call our Australian variety) is quite astounding!!  I've had a lot of questions about where the Argiopes are going to, as some people have noticed that theirs has disappeared. Unfortunately this lovely spider only has a short life span and once she has produced one or more (usually no more than 3) brown, papery egg sacs, she will die. The egg sacs are roughly round in shape and up to 25 mm in diameter; each contains 300 to 1400 eggs. She attaches her egg sacs to one side of her web, close to her resting position at the centre. Each female will watch over her eggs as long as she can, but will die in the first hard frost, if not before. The eggs hatch in Autumn ( fall), but spiderlings stay in the sac during winter and emerge in spring. (Milne and Milne 1980,Heiber 1992, Faulkner 1999). The St Andrew's Cross Spider doesn't have dangerous venom. Its bite causes a mild local pain. There are also other varieties of Argiopes - The Banded Argiope and Silver Argiope being two that have been sent in frequently. There are links to photos of these and other argiopes below as well.

Argiope Lobata St Andrews Cross Black & Yellow Argiopes
Banded Argiopes Gea Hepatgon/Argiope Appensa Silver Argiopes

BLACK & YELLOW ARGIOPES

30 December, 2005:
Hi Glen! This really nice picture was taken in the summer. I wondered if you would want to use this for the Argiopes page, and the web of the month. If so, Thank you so much. Anyone could use this picture if they want to.

Joe

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7 December, 2005:
hi,
I found this spider while walking through one of floridas parks. Is this a
silver back agriope?

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6 December, 2005:
Here is a beauty of an Argiope. They appeared in my garden for several seasons and last season I took these photos. In one you can see that the body appears to be translucent. Is this really the case? I was told by one person that these are sometimes called Southern Writing Spiders, and they write a person's name in the zig zag the night before they die. Quite the spooky legend! However my spideys never wrote anything so I feel safe for now......  I am sending a bunch of pix, feel free to post what you like best, I realize its a lot of photos.  Excellent website for spider lovers!
Marty Bodine
Kansas City MO, USA

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23 November, 2005:
Please help id. Found this spider on the outside of a car door in San Diego in August. It is approx. 1.5 cm long.
Thanks,
Jay
jvavra@san.rr.com

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21 November, 2005:
I am sending you these pictures we took of a spider we found in PEI Canada in hopes you can identify it.
Thanks
Joy & Don Hvizdos

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18 November, 2005:
Hello – we had a spider living in our shrubs in our front yard this past summer. Our daughter named her Stella. We believe she was a black & yellow argiope, or an orb spider (unless they are the same thing) based on pictures we found online. We watched her all summer building webs and eating bugs. She lived on our front porch for quite a while too. She was quite big, then all of sudden was quite small and left us a large papery egg sack on our front porch (see photo) attached to our porch railing and a potted chrysanthemum. Then she disappeared – I’m assuming she died, although we told our daughter (she’s 3) she went to her winter home. I’d like to move the chrysanthemum, and as much as we liked Stella, I’m not overly excited about having hundreds of little spiders on my front porch come spring. Is there a way I can move the sack somewhere? There’s a big field across the street with shrubs and trees, or I could put it in the back yard. I don’t just want to dump it somewhere, and am not sure how to put it somewhere safe so it will hatch. Do you have any suggestions? I also attached a cool photo my husband took through the glass on our front door. Thank you, Liz Jenkins

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16 November, 2005:
Hi Glen! Just giving you a few last pics of this spider for the year. The couple of pics I'm giving you are good to set as a background (At least I think so). Try It!!!

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13 November, 2005:
Glen you have a great website! I have never seen a spider this big in N.J. before, so I looked it up on your site to see what it was. It must have been 6 inches long. I'm use to little spiders I had to run and get the camera with this one. Thanks for helping me identify it.
Doug, Manalapan, N.J.

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8 November, 2005:
I found this on the side of my house, and I can’t tell what it is.

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6 November, 2005:
Hi Again Glen! I just wanted to share with you and your site viewers a bunch of little Black and Yellow Garden Spiderlings. (I am most definite that these are the spiders because they came right out of a damaged egg sack that a bird got a hold of. I put the egg sack in a plastic jar and the spiderlings thought it was warm enough to come out of the egg sack an rest on an imperfect tangled web they made. I told them they shouldn't come out so early because I am not letting them out until the weather gets warmer)
Thanks, Joe

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3 November, 2005:
Hi Glen,
I was looking through your site today and thought I'd share with you a picture I took this summer of an Argiope in my garden. Also, I came across this big one and wondered what kind it was...Thanks for your help and your cool site.

Jamie
Topsham, ME

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24 October, 2005:
Hi! My name is Debbie Reed and I live and work at a camp in Northeastern Ohio. In the valley where the camp is located, we see many odd creatures—animals, insects, and spiders. I’ve used your site to classify some of these spiders. If you are interested, I have attached two photos of spiders. We commonly see huge wolf spiders here, but have noticed some others this fall.  The first picture is a black and yellow argiope found in its web on the siding behind one of our building’s kitchens.  The other spider was found while we were taking a walk through the grass. Its colorful body caught the attention of one of the walkers and then we were awed by its similar appearance to the Hermit Crab. Thank you for the information on your website! Your help is ever appreciated!  Sincerely,
Debbie Reed
Elkhorn Valley Adventures Director
Elkhorn Valley Christian Service Camp
8200 Carnation Rd.
Bergholz, OH 43908
www.elkhornvalley.com
Debbie@elkhornvalley.com

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24 October, 2005:
Greetings...I take pictures of anything small and that will sit still long enough for me to get my camera out. And one day, while my son and I were picking red raspberries at Hicks Orchard in Granville, NY we came across two different spiders which I hadn't noticed before. Could you tell me what they are? I have attached two photos to this e-mail...and folks..these ARE NOT hoaxes...these are actual spiders. The striped spider has two red bars on the underside of the abdomen that run nearly the length of it's abdomen (I have bad photos of the red bars but if you'd like I could send those.) The other spider has a freakishly looking skull pattern on it's back. If you know what they are, could you enlighten me on them? Are they poisonous? Thank you,
Justin Morris

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22 October, 2005:
Hi, We have enjoyed the company of this garden spider in our gazebo. Attached is a photo of her and her egg sack. One problem, we will need to take the canvas off of the gazebo for winter storage. What would be the best way to transfer her egg sack to a safe location without harming the sack? Thanks and Take Care. Ellen Tennessee

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13 October, 2005:
Hey; Nice web site. Great photos, good info, and it looks nice. I found a couple of spiders that look something like this one but not an exact match, can you help me identify this guy?
roger

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15 October, 2005:
Some cool spider shots

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13 October, 2005:
I saw your website and thought I'd share a picture of the wild life action happening in my front yard. Yum Yum!

Ricardo
Pace, Florida
 

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12 October, 2005:
Attached is a picture of a very large and quite beautiful spider I took recently in North Carolina, on the Outer Banks. It was enormous, the body was certainly 2" long. A local told me it was a called a "Garden spider". Usually, in the insect or animal world, vivid coloring signifies an ability to make chemical warfare of some sort. Do you know if this spider is particularly venomous?
Best Regards.
Farrell Hope

Click for a larger view.

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9 October, 2005:
Spider has been here about 3wks, we just left it to observe. As you can see by the picture we have two Pods. Spider is still alive, 10/8/05 Southwestern Ohio.
Doug

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1 October, 2005:
I
took this photo of a female Argiope in my front yard flowers last weekend and I thought I'd share it with you, since I used your site to identify what it was. Steve, Oswego, IL

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28 September, 2005:
Sorry forgot to put on the message!!

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22 September, 2005:
Hi, I took this picture in my front yard. The web was spun across two trees and a hammock, I thought it was pretty cool looking so I looked it up on your websight to find out what kind it was. The information was very helpfull.

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22 September, 2005:
I have a St. Andrews spider web in my back yard (Austin, TX). Yesterday evening I noticed something large in the web. I discovered that it is a hummingbird, all wrapped up in a silk sac. The spider has been feeding on it today. Yuck! I didn't know their prey included small birds. I haven't been able to get a clear picture yet, but am attaching the one I do have.
Sue Wells

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16 September, 2005:
I have always been awe inspired by spiders that spin a large round web. I noticed a large spider (large by the size of spiders typically found in the area, it was about 1.5 inches overall length including the legs) spinning a new web right in front of a floodlight. I have always liked to watch spiders build their webs and this was even more interesting since the floodlight made the spider almost glow as it weaved the web. I was leaning against the edge of the garage door while watching the web being made and noticed a movement right beside my hand.  Now if a 1.5 inch long spider is large for this area, the 3 inch long spider almost holding my hand made me take a few very large steps back. I ran in and got my camera and ruler. At the time I took these I did not know that the spider was not dangerous so that is why the ruler is a good distance away from the spider in this picture.
After I took the pictures I came in to look up what this spider was on the internet. After visiting 2-3 educational websites with no useful information about a large yellow spider, I found your website. I knew I would find the answer on your site when I saw the Argiope picture next to the logo. I have attached the best picture with a ruler in it to send to you. As you can see in the picture it was not on a web. If you or someone else wants to use it that is fine with me.
Matt Knighten
Rome, Georgia USA

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16 September, 2005:
Taken on Sep 8 2005

My wife saw this and took the pictures.

Ron & Jo Dolce
Kankakee, IL

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16 September, 2005:
I was intrigued more by the spider than the web. I hope you don't mind.

Gene/Virginia Beach

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14 September, 2005:
Hi, I found this beauty in my front garden. She startled me with he bright colours. I have never seen one before.  I went on line to find out what it was and found your site. Now I know I can just leave her to do her thing  and that she isn’t a danger to anyone. Thanks so much for your site.
Sincerely, Sharon
Nova Scotia, Canada

Click for a larger view.

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11 September, 2005:
Hello, you kindly identified a garden orb weaver for me last year. I  wonder would you mind identifying another spider? Its markings are  quite striking. Thanks! Carina

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11 September, 2005:
Hi I was wondering if this spider usually is found in NJ at all? This is a web pic I found. I don't want to get too close to take a pic. Spiders scare me.  Thanks.
Valerie

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10 September, 2005:
Hi Glen! I woke up this morning and found a large white ball moving in the bushes when I looked out of my front living room window and soon realized that another one of my Black and Yellow Garden Spiders making and egg sack. When the spider is making the egg sack, the silk is white, then it eventually turns brown as the spider finishes. These pictures are so clear that when enlarged, the egg sack unfinished looks like a snowball. The internet says these spiders make egg sacks up to an inch in diameter, but this egg sack seemed larger than that. (Anyone can use these pictures if they want to.) Thank You!  Joe
Click for a larger view.

8 September, 2005:
Hi Glen! I want to send you some pics of the largest Black and Yellow Argiope spiders I've had this year. One thing I forgot to tell you last time I sent you more pics. Twice I was bitten by these black and yellow garden spiders trying to feed them moths. (Talk about poor eye vision.) It only felt like a little pinch that went away in a couple of minutes. When I feed them moths, I have to hold it in their webs until the spiders get it. So this spider thought my fingers were part of its food. But, this does not mean that the spiders are aggressive, or that they will bite if you throw a bug in the web, so anyone who has these spiders to please not harm them in any way. (Also, anyone who wants to use these pics for anything may go ahead and do so.)
Thanks!!! Joe

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7 September, 2005:
Found this critter perched on our tent while attending a Rolling Stones concert in New Brunswick Canada on Sept 03.
Never having seen one of these before she, ( i am assuming female), gave us quite a fright. I am glad to see she is not venomous or aggressive. We were feeling the heebie-jeebies in our tent that nite! :) Cheers mate!
Monty

Click for a larger view.
 

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6 September, 2005:
I love your web site! It is amazing and very informative. I wish most people would try to read about spiders and not kill them. Here is a picture of my garden spider or golden garden spider that I found in my sinkhole in Murfreesboro, TN. It saddens me to know that she will die after she lays her eggs in the fall. Christie Stewart = : )
Murfreesboro, TN.
msvider@comcast.net

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5 September, 2005:
Hey...I took this picture outside my mother in law's house. I just thought I'd send it to ya since it looks pretty neat!

Thanks,
Shelley
BTW, this is an amazing site!

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5 September, 2005:
I notice this spider while I was gathering Snap Dragon Flower seeds. A search of the internet has turned up nothing.
Richard Hoag
Walled Lake MI

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3 September, 2005:
I am in Michigan and saw this spider in my yard. Do you possibly know what kind it is?
Thanks
Mary Rue

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3 September, 2005:
I discovered this giant spidey on the front of our shed. I was so happy to discover your site and learn that she wasn't poisonous or dangerous...but, I've got to admit, the idea of those egg sacs freaks me out a little. Ok...a lot. (That is, assuming it's even female.) But, is there a good way to move her to some other location? Somewhere far, far away? Ha ha...I definitely don't want to kill her, but I'd also like to get in our shed again without having a heart attack! Thanks so much!
- Michelle Jenkins

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2 September, 2005:
Hi Glen,
Here is a picture of a Garden Spider munching on a grasshopper (or possibly saving it for later). I am happy to know that these spiders are harmless, because they are all over my yard. I had no idea what kind of spiders these were until visiting your site. Thanks for all of the great information!
Jennifer Moyer

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1 September, 2005:
Please identify the 'beast' for me! It was found in Walkerton Ontario Canada! Thanks Frank

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Reply: I don't think so, the males are usually much smaller.
1 September, 2005:
Attached are two pictures of argiopes found in my back  yard in Bryan, Texas. Is one a female and the other a male?
Charles A. Roessner, Ph. D.

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1 September, 2005:
This was low down between a building and a bush. Amazing. The next day Found one on a hydrangia bush quite low down. Dying to know about it! Mickey de Rham

Click for a larger view.

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31  August, 2005:
Hello: I stumbled upon your site, and enjoyed perusing the photos of various spiders. I did not see the attached orb weaver, though. This one is fairly common around Raleigh, NC. It appears to be one tough customer. Can you
identify it? Thanks. Tom

Click for a larger view.

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30  August, 2005:
this spider lives in walpole massachsetts. we are 10 miles west of boston.m he lives at a carwash. is he common this far north? i have spent a lot of time outside and have never seen anything like him. please e mail me back if you have time. i just want to know if you get this. thank you john hunt

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30  August, 2005:
My daughter found this spider in the daisies. Any idea what it is? It is very large and didn't shy away when we were taking pictures. Thanks!
KB in PA

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29 August, 2005:
Hi! My 4 year old son and I are looking to identify this spider we took  a photo of outside Mom Mom and Pop Pop's house in southern New Jersey. Thanks for any help you can provide. Dave & Lucas Fithian.

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28 August, 2005:
Hi Glen. This is Joe from Upstate New York.  I just wanted to share with you and all the other people that looks through your fascinating web pages that I've found, early in the morning, a Garden Spider weaving a HUGE egg sack.  (I'll send you 5 pictures of the spider making the egg sack.)  It looked like the spider was going to start making it a little higher but decided to do it a little lower.  Last night around 7:30P.M., she left her web in search for a good spot to make her egg sack.  I followed her wander all around until I decided to go in around 9:00P.M., went to bed early and woke up the next day around 5:30A.M. and went out around 6:00 A.M. and found her making an egg sack 3 feet away from her web.  (I was wandering if you or anyone else can help me out, too?  I read on the internet that these spiders make one or more brown papery egg sacks and attaches it on one side of her web close to her resting position near the center.  But, the spiders I have make their egg sacks in surrounding plants away from her web.  Please reply to me if anyone has any comments about this behavior.  Thanks.)  I was gone for most of the day and when I came back, I wanted to check on the egg sack until I found that the village workers weed-whacked all the tall plants including the area that both the egg sacks were in.  (Remember I sent you the first one?) So I looked around to find the egg sack and found it, but it felt lighter than I imagined it to be.  So I held it up to the sun and found no eggs in it.  All this did was make me wander.

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Reply:  They are actually called black and yellow argiopes in the US as they build a different white pattern, not the St Andrew's Cross pattern hat ours here in Australia build.

26 August, 2005:
Attached is a picture of a St Andrews Cross taken in my backyard in Charlotte, NC on 8/26/05. Chris Godfrey

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26 August, 2005:
Hey,
I found a St. Andrews Cross in my yard today. I found your website and decided to check it out and found out that alot have found these spiders too! Here's some pics.

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26 August, 2005:
My husband is currently working on building a new home on the site of the owner's previous soy bean field in a small town near Flint, Michigan. He has been working on this site for the last month or so and has seen this unusual spider in the same spot in a near by ditch each day. It is about an inch or more in length, has distinctive yellow and black markings, and weaves out a coiled web trail within its web. It is very fast and wraps bugs and moths quickly as soon as they hit the web that it has spun across the ditch. We have looked up many types of spiders common to Michigan and have not run across this to be able to identify the type. Please help identify the type of spider this is and if it is something to not mess with!!
Thank you for your help......

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25 August, 2005:
Hi
I came across your website whilst browsing for some information. I took this picture this morning of a spider I havent seen before, I live in Alabama USA, the spider measures 2 to 3 inches in length. Is it poisonous?

thanks for your time
Rich Scales, USA, AL

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23 August, 2005:
I found this Little Lady today in my Oregano and spent hours watching her. The sack she has contains a Yellow Jacket. I took so many pictures that I could only narrow them down to this.
Hope
Upstate New York

Nice pics, click for a larger view!!

 

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23 August, 2005:
Hi, I have a few pictures of an Argiope aurantia that has taken up residence on my back patio. When we first met, she had a web near the ground and had a body the size of a pencil eraser. She's now a fine specimen whose body was the size of my thumb prior to her laying the first batch of eggs. She's rapidly regaining her size. At first, I thought the other two smaller spiders cohabitating with her were possibly males. Some research turns up that they were kleptoparasitic spiders - spiders which use another spider's web for catching prey. Perhaps of the Argyroides genus, although I cannot find any images online for confirmation. They are often found in the webs of large Argiopes.  After watching the web a while I understand why. About10 minutes after taking these pictures, a swirl of gnats passed through the web. Some, naturally, were caught. She couldn't be bothered withsomething that small but the two kleptos raced for their dinners. She saves her efforts for insects housefly-size or larger. The largest thing I've seen her catch was a dragonfly which was larger than she was. This was a few days prior to her laying the first eggs. Given the warm climate here (Austin, TX), I expect she'll produce another egg case and possibly a third given how good the dining is where she's located her nest.  I like your site. Keep up the good work! -Michael

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23 August, 2005:
I came across your site trying to identify a spider I found in our garden. I thought it was a common "garden spider" which is what my father always called it. I did not know they were known as orb spiders. Interesting!! Anyhow, I just thought I'd send these 2 pictures of our resident here in Leesport(southeasthern) Pennsylvania USA.  Heather

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22 August, 2005:
Can anyone tell me what type of spider this is?
Dangerous? - NO
Poisonous? - NO
Aggressive? - NO

-- Regards,
David

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22 August, 2005:
Can you identify this spider, I found him in our garden in a web spun between day lily leaves. We live in Massachusetts.

Would love to know what he or she is and is it poisonous? I have never seen such a large spider around here before.

Thank you,
Kristine Allen

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21 August, 2005:
This guy lives on my barn in howell, michigan. I found him today 8-20-05 I think its a yellow garden spider but im not sure, he is quite large though. well enjoy.

Click for a larger view.

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19 August, 2005:
Found this one this morning! Suzanne Schaul, Wauconda, IL

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19 August, 2005:
glen, while i was working at a camp outside a church i came across a, what seems to be a mutated spider. It is ~2.5 inches long and has 4 legs on one side and 2 legs and a claw on the other side. I was hoping you could identify it, and if it was dangerous.
thank you, steff

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19 August, 2005:
HMy friend found this in our garden last night eating a moth. A purple/yellow spider in Wisconsin! Wierd to me, but cool nonetheless.  If anyone can identify, it'd be appreciated. Thanks. Kevin Milwaukee,WI

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19 August, 2005:
Here’s one for you and your experts to identify. Hopefully it’s not a dangerous one.

Let me know if you can.

Steven Bast
East Troy, Wisconsin

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19 August, 2005:
I  A friend of mine found this spider and was going to squash it. I took it home I have had her for about two weeks now. She is a very amazing spider. Here is a picture of her with her favorite food, a bee. You can do whatever with the picture. Your website is awesome.
Thank You
Ginnie

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19 August, 2005:
I took a picture of this spider using a camera phone, so it isn’t the greatest. It was quite large however, so I went and got my real camera and took pictures, that I have not developed yet. I could not find any info relating to what kind of spider this is, and was wondering if you can relate any info or resources to where I can find information about this type of spider.
I have attached a jpg image of the spider. Any help is appreciated. Thanks - Jared
 

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17 August, 2005:
Can you confirm this is a Black & Yellow
Argiope? Also, is there a difference between a male and female? Pleasefeel free to use this picture taken in my garden in Southern N.J. Larry Hennessy

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17 August, 2005:
Glen, One of the spiders already made an egg sack. Seemed just like yesterday that I e-mailed you and told you I will e-mail you again when one of the spiders make an egg sack. (hee hee) I will send you a picture of the spider before she made the egg sack, pictures of the egg sack, and a picture of the same spider after she made the egg sack. ( I hope at least a few of the thousand spiderlings stay for next year.) Last spring, I took one of the spiderlings that just emerged from the egg sack to measure and study it. The spiderlings have whitish bodies are only 1mm long. (I think they gain their yellow after the fourth or fifth molting.) Thanks for the replies you gave me for the other times!
Sincerely, Joe

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16 August, 2005:
Hi! It's Joe again. Just thought to send you some more pictures of the Black and Yellow Argiope Spiders around my house. I fed one of the spiders that looked hungry a dragonfly three times the size of her! She seemed excited that she got it, so without hesitating, the spider rushed down to her prey, and delivered a bite before she started to wrap it up. One of the photos I'm sending you is a picture of that spider eating it. I thought you might enjoy looking at these pictures. (I am again giving anyone who wants to use these pictures permission to use them.) It has been debatable as to why these spiders make there web design (zigzags of silk). I've been studying these spiders for four years and I think I figured out why. Sometimes, when I walk up to these spiders I see them flip right to the other side of the swatch of silk sit on. (I read that since these spiders have poor eye vision and are very sensitive to wind currents, they can still detect your presence by feeling a change in the wind current.) So I think they build their web design to make themselves less visible to predators when they are on the other side of their webs, and more visible to us and other animals so we don't destroy their webs that took them hours to build. I'll write to you again maybe if I find the eggsack to one of them. ( Which would probably be soon because of the looks of these spiders. ENORMOUS!)
Thanks!!!

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16 August, 2005:
Glenn, Here is a great picture of a spider that was found on campus in Santa Clara, last week we found this during our family day event here at Nvidias campus. Please let me know if you can identify it. I have searched many sights today and have found yours to be the most helpful, complete of all of them.

Jon

Click for a larger view.

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16 August, 2005:
I am submitting this picture in hope that it could be identified. I took this picture yesterday after noticing it near the flower I was photographing. It was taken in Hamilton, Ontario Canada. Thanks.
 

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16 August, 2005:
How wonderful to have found my spider on your web site. How sad that they do not live long. I'll not disturb the web area since I now know her babies might be living there during the winter. I believe completely in the fact that there are benificial "bugs" not to mention this one is so beautiful.

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Reply: That is Argiope aurantia, the black
and yellow argiope. Here is a site with info, to get you started at least. Nathan Hepworth

15 August, 2005:
Hey, I'm into photography a lot, and yesterday I was out in some woods and I came across a spider (see attachment). It was on its circular web that was attached to some underbrush in the forest. I live in Illinois about an hour west of Chicago, and I have never seen a spider like this one before. I wasn't able to get any pictures of the other side of the spider because that was a lot of brush in the area. Whatever information you have on it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

--David Musick

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15 August, 2005:
I was wondering if you could identify this spider. I found it on the side of my house.
I'm very curious to know about it.
Thanks!

Click for a larger view.

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15 August, 2005:
Hi Glen,
I found this lovely in my garden. I have to tell you, I have a very large phobia. I took this shot with a telephoto lens so I wasn't too close to it. Could you tell me what kind of Spider it is and if it is harmful?
Thank you,
Robyne Gensel

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15 August, 2005:
Hello, We woke up to a large scream from my daughter in the backyard... Here is the reason why.... Thought you would appreciate this  masterful picture of an Argiope Aurantia having a meal..
Cheers,
Richard and Cecile Ellert
Newburyport, MA - USA

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13 August, 2005:
I live in North Central PA. I was outside today and found this spider hanging from its web on a bush. I've never seen anything like it and was wondering what species it is and if it is poisonous.
Thank You
Don

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13 August, 2005:
Found one of these in my front yard. Does anyone know what it is?

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13 August, 2005:
Spider on our ranch.

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12 August, 2005:
To the gang at SpiderzRule.Com, My wife and I got a start at identifying this spider by visiting your site. The next day, we woke to find a much smaller version of the same spider also occupying the same web, and we are guessing the smaller of the two is the
male. Anyway, we wanted to share the photos. Thanks for a great site, and for taking the time to do it. I earn my living on the web, and I know how much time a web site can take. Your effort is so appreciated. :) The McGraw Family, Baltimore, MD USA

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8 August, 2005:
Could you tell us what kind of spider this is?

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8 August, 2005:
Could you tell us what kind of spider this is? We live in Louisiana and found it outside our back door yesterday?
Thanks,
Kory and Laurie

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8 August, 2005:
Hello, I have been trying to identify this spider with little success, and I hope  that you could help. I live in Trabuco Canyon, Southern California near Mission Viejo. This spider was located outside the condo's common grass and  flower area. Thank you! Glenn

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8 August, 2005:
Hi, I am from Northeast Pa and have lived here a long time. I have never seen these spiders here before and this summer I have 4. Could you please tell me what they are and if they are poisonous. Also will they try to come inside once colder weather is upon us? Thanks Paula

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6 August, 2005:
I took the attached photo of a spider found in my garage. I have checked the web and can't seem to find a picture of one with the same markings. I imagine it's simply harmless, but I worry about my dog being bitten. Any idea what this little guy is?

By the way, I live in the state of Michigan, USA.

Beth

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6 August, 2005:
Glen, Your website is very helpful. We had never seen one of these spiders before. Has been on our tomato plant for a couple of weeks. During the day, it only has four legs out and at night all 8 are displayed. Really neat spider. Glad we did not hurt it. Made a Navy port call in Freemantle/Perth. WA is beautiful.  Thanks greatly, John and Pam Kersh

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6 August, 2005:
These photos were taken August 5, 2005 in Markham Ontario Canada. (Just north of Toronto) I Thought you might enjoy them. Sincerely, Kim Pearce

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3 August, 2005:
Hi. I love your website. I went through all three pages of pictures and thought they were really great. I live in Albany NY. There is a pond in the park near my house where there are about thirty (including the small males) black and yellow garden spiders around one area. I relocated about half of them in my garden the other day and left the rest back at the pond. One of the females is having a blast because she thought the ideal spot to build her web was right near a yellow jackets' nest in the ground. Anyway, I just thought to send you a few pictures of some of the spiders I have. The first picture I'm sending you is the largest spider we have in our garden so far. The second picture is the spider that made her web by a yellow jackets' nest and the third picture is a spider just getting ready to molt for the last time. (It takes her about 10 minutes for her to slip out of her old skin and About 20 minutes for her to hang limp.) If anyone wants to use these pictures for anything, they have my permission to do so.
Thanks! Joe

Click for a larger view.

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2 August, 2005:
Found this in my granny's garden. Do you know what kind it is? Thanks if you do:)

Shannon
 

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1 August, 2005:
Never saw one like this before, look at the web  i'm not into spiders, so if this is a common one sorry to bother u. i look at a few on your web page there are so many.


 
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26 July, 2005:
For the past five years we have had this spider appear out of nowhere and then be gone. I figured the spider had a great coping ability with the cold weather we have in New York during the winter. But I see it is just offspring’s of the original spider that came to reside here. It moves its web every year. One year it was in our black berries plants, the next in our grapes, this year it picked a tractor that was covered with a tarp. I have enclosed a set of pictures of it for your website. Sorry for the quality, but I really don’t like spiders at all.. But this one is interesting to watch…

Mason
 

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17 July, 2005:
Dear Glen, Love your website. Found the information I was looking for in less than a
minute. This beautiful female is loving the bushes in my front yard. As most females would, my first reaction was to kill it. But my kids and I became fascinated by her. Keep up the good work on the website. Enjoy my
picture too.
Sincerely,
Stephanie Skarren
Austin, TX
 

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13 June, 2005:
Hi, I just discovered your site after trying to identify a huge spider I  found in my house last night. I believe it was either a male wolf  spider or a male orb weaver. I was then inspired to send these  photos, which I took in my yard last summer. The first two are of a  wolf spider with her babies emerging from the egg sack and crawling  onto her body, and the others are two different Garden Spiders. Dates  are below each photo. Nice site! K L Thalin, Saxtons River, VT

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10 June, 2005:

Nice website! Thought I'd send some spider pics to you from east TN and west NC. I think the pics are funnel web spider, lampshade spider, garden orb weaver, black and yellow argiope, and a fishing spider.

Greg
 

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8 April, 2005:
Do you know what kind of spider this is? Found it in Kauai
 

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