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Spider Photos - Tree Trunk Spider

Tree trunk spiders belong to the Family Hersiliidae. There are about 150 species in this family and many more undiscovered. ve spider and thus is most unlikely to cause significant harm.

Female Tree Spiders are around 19mm in body length from its chelicerae to the tip of its spinnerets. When her legs stretched out, its longest legs can reach 45mm.

They range in size from about 10 mm (0.4 inch) to 18 mm (0.7 inch)long including the "Tails"

Tree spiders are beautiful with multicolor pattern that helps them in camouflaging against the tree trunks they live on.

Being very well camouflaged for life on the varicolored trunks of trees, they have an interesting way of capturing prey. Rather than making a web that captures prey directly, they lay a light coating of threads over an area of tree bark and wait hidden in plain sight for an insect to stray onto that patch. Once that occurs, they direct their spinnerets toward their prey and circle it all the while casting silk on it. When the hapless insect has been thoroughly immobilized they can bite it through its new shroud.

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TREE TRUNK SPIDERS

15 October, 2015:
Hi team. Thanks a lot for your reply... I will wait for your response. Here is another closer look of the body. I just took the pic. May be I was lucky to find it once again. Hope this will help in ur research. And also if u see carefully the spider has two sting(like scorpion) like thing on its back-end....

 

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Reply: It flew off? Anyway interesting spider and found out it is called a tree trunk spider and belongs to the Family Hersiliidae. They are also known as two tailed spiders- glen

15 October, 2015:
Hi, This is my first mail regarding information about spider. I took this pic yesterday night. Could you please help me with some relevant information... This is all I have before it flew off....

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