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Spider Photos - Tailless Whip Scorpions/Whip Scorpions

Tailless whip scorpions look at first glance like spiders. The first appendages (pedipalps) are modified for grasping prey, with hook-like projections. The first true pair of legs is modified to serve as “feelers,” and are long, delicate, and whip-like, with many fine hairs.

Tailless whip scorpions are reclusive predators of insects. They hunt nocturnally, using their long, delicate first pair of legs to find their food. The spined pedipalps impale and crush the prey and then transfer it to the chelicerae (jaws). Tailless whip-scorpions can only pinch their prey; they lack venom glands.

Their relation, the whip scorpion have a life pattern similar to the true scorpions, but they do not possess a poisonous sting. Their flat body enables them to squeeze into extremely narrow cracks and crevices, where they prey on small arthropods and worms. A few of the larger species also attack small vertebrates, especially frogs. The palps are developed into strong pincers equipped with sharp teeth and spines, which are used for catching and crushing prey. The first pair of legs are generally much longer and thinner than the other three pairs, and may have more a tactile function rather than walking. The species shown opposite belongs to the family Theliphonidae, whose members have a characteristic long, thread-like tail. The tail, which bears numerous fine hairs, has only a sensory function, but can be waved about in a whip-like manner - hence the common name. Although whip scorpions are not venomous, some species defend themselves by squirting an acrid fluid from defence glands situated at the base of the tail. n the other families of the order, the tail is much reduced or absent altogether - these forms are sometimes called whip spiders, rather than whip scorpions. The group as a whole is largely confined to the tropics and sub-tropics, but nevertheless widely distributed with representatives found in China, Japan, India and other parts of Southern Asia, the greater part of Africa, and in Central and South America.

 All photos are copyright to their owners and may not be reproduced without permission. Please choose a section.

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Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
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Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
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 WHIP SCORPIONS

Reply: This is a whip scorpion - glen

9 January, 2014
What is this?!?! :O

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Reply: This is a whip scorpion - glen

9 January, 2014
Hi I hope you can help me find out what this is. I just moved into a new apartment and have dogs so I need to know if its safe. Thanks, Tanya

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Reply: Looks like a whip scorpion.  http://www.kendall-bioresearch.co.uk/whipscorp.htm

13 June, 2006:
hey, my name is joshua and my wife and i were leaving our appartment when we saw this thing in the dirt out side. it is still alive even though its legs are tucked under it self. At first glance i thought it was a scorpion, but after closer reveiw i thought that it may be some sort of solfugid. im not sure about all of the characteristics to determine or decipher its classification. i do know that this thing has some sort of long tail approx. an inch or inch and a half. i dont know if if you can see it in the pics. please e mail me back. thanx joshua

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TAILLESS WHIP SCORPIONS

18 July,  2014:
Thanks for being a good sport. pics are taken around here. See! we do have real spiders! We are still getting a kick out of the "Chinalimus"! Wes

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

9 January, 2014
What kind of spider is this

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

9 January, 2014
Hello Glen We have found this spider in our bathroom yesterday evening. Can you please identify it for us? Thank you

 

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

9 January, 2014
found in Arizona the front is head not pinchers any clue 2 what it is? Mark

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

14 April, 2013
I have been all over the internet trying to find some help with identifying a spider. I am in Mazatlan Mexico. I have not been about to find a person that tell me what it is. I know it isn't any of the spiders that I have seen so far. I have looked at many pictures. I'm starting to think I found something special. this spider was found in and undisturbed dry area in the corner of a shed. It was in a agricultural area. Mango's corn and such. It's folded arms in the front extent with very visible stingers. It's hair like legs are different than anything I can find. It was about 8 inches across. Can you help me. I have posted test spider on face book. Asked Yahoo.com people and still no luck. My name is Robin, and I look forward to hearing back from you...

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

22 June, 2012:
Found at Manzanillo, México, this Was the smallest of three in my backyard, the biggest had an 8" legspan  

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion too - glen

22 June, 2012:
What is this AZ slider?  

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Reply: This is a tailless whip scorpion - glen

15 April, 2012:
Hi, just want to say I'm a big fan of your website. I have a few spider pictures you may be interested in. I live in Cyprus, Paphos...all pics were taken here. Also there are many species here that have not been publicized. Thanks for your time, would appreciate it if my pictures were not distributed...showing them on your site would be greatly appreciated though :) Matt Smith  

Click for a larger view.

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11 July, 2011:
Hi Glen, I just came across your site and I love it. I've spent an hour of work browsing through it and I still can't ID some spiders I saw recently on a trip to Cambodia. the photos are attached. Please use them if you'd like. If you can ID them for me I'd be grateful. Also let me know if you'd like ghigher res photos. I took these at 10MP but reduced them for the email. Thanks, Ashkun
 

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7 December, 2010:
Glen - I can't believe it! I was looking through my community's magazine just now and there was a photo of the bug that I tried to describe to you a couple years back. This same bug was in my house, so I captured it with glass and let it outside. But after I couldn't find out what it was, I found your Web site and contacted you trying to describe him to you with a very bad drawing (at that time I forgot to take a picture.) Well, you didn't know what I was talking about, so I never found out what kind of bug/spider it was. But here it is now! One of the residents of my community took a picture. I tore the page out and scanned it. You'll see the bug at the top center. Do you know what this is? I told you it had "rectangles" as eyes or on its head!!!! And you thought I was drinking that night ;-) Look forward to your reply. Thanks, Mary Gold Canyon, Arizona USA by the Superstition Mountains 45 minutes east of Phoenix

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2 December, 2008:
My girlfriend is going to school in Grenada. This guy lives in their laundry room... and they only see him on the walls at night. She says that his body is about 2-3 inches long and his leg span is around 6 inches across. Pretty neat creature!

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15 February, 2007:
Can you tell us what kind of spider this is? It was found on the wall of our bodega in Zihuatanejo Mexico (January 2007).
The picture beside the spider is about 9 X 14 inches.
Thanks Jean Thomson Canada

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14 July, 2006:
I found this spider in my garage in Lake Havasu, AZ. Have no idea what it is. Can you help me? Thanks, Jason

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15 January, 2006:

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Reply: It's a tailless whipscorpion and harmless.

19 April
, 2005:
Hi Glen i hope you can help with this, i live in the UK and my Dad works out in Africa in Ghana in the jungle for a tree felling company, he knows im terrified of spiders and sent me this photo he took of one near his house !! he wants to know what it is and when im coming to visit!!! never now i've seen this thing. Apparently its the size of a dinner plate! thanks Jo Brundall

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Reply: Looks like a Tailless Whipscorpion to me.
6 January, 2005:
Hi Glen. Saw your website. My wife and I saw lots of spiders in Costa Rica, but this one takes the cake! Big and gnarly this one! I've never seen a spider with arms that extend out from either side of it's head with scorpion-like pincher/stingers on the end. Unfortunately, our local guide killed it because they were pretty darn sure it was poisonous. Any ideas what kind this guy is???
Thanks.Carrington Barrs

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13 August, 2004
Do you have any idea what this is? With
legspan it was about 3" across.

I took the pic on my patio in Tucson, Arizona
last night.

Thanks,
John

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19 September, 2002:
Buenos dias
La presente es para contarles que en el patio de mi casa encontre un animal extraño que parece araña, tiene patas largas, y dos flagelos como antenas, y tiene unas tenazas.  Les envio una foto de este animal para saber si ustedes tienen datos que me puedan proporcionar y saber cual es el nombre y que clase de animal es. Gracias, Atentamente,
Alfonso Ordoñez, Guatemala, Guatemala,
Centro America, E-mail: alfonsoordonez@icasa.com.gt

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